Tobago Street Police Station

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Re: Tobago Street Police Station

Postby Lucky Poet » Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:49 pm

cumbo wrote:Image

Wow 8O
All the world seems in tune on a Spring afternoon, when we're poisoning pigeons in the park.
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Re: Tobago Street Police Station

Postby HollowHorn » Thu Aug 06, 2009 6:53 pm

The now semi-derelict building in Tobago Street which housed both the Eastern Division Police Office and the Eastern Police Court. Charging Thunder spent an uncomfortable weekend here at New Year 1892.

There were probably a fair number of hangovers in Glasgow on the morning of Friday, the first of January 1892. One of these belonged to a twenty-four year-old Lakota Indian named Charging Thunder. To make matters worse, he awoke in a prison cell, and had to make an appearance in the Eastern Police Court to answer for the assault which he had perpetrated on George Crager on the afternoon before. The case was continued until Monday morning, owing to the fact that Mr Crager was still nursing a sore head of his own, although in this instance alcohol was not the immediate cause. When the case was called on Monday morning, Charging Thunder was remanded in custody, and his case was remitted to the Sheriff Court.
When the case came before the Sheriff on the 12th of January, Charging Thunder pled guilty through an interpreter, who would either have been John Shangrau or else Crager himself. In mitigation, Charging Thunder claimed that his lemonade had been 'mistakenly' spiked with whisky! He was however unable to identify the pub in which he had been drinking. The Sheriff sentenced him to thirty days imprisonment in Glasgow's notorious Barlinnie prison.

Several Glasgow newspapers carried accounts of the hearing on the following day, 13th January. Quite remarkably, Charging Thunder was not the only American Indian whose brush with the law was reported on that day. Running Wolf, from Mexican Joe's show had also fallen foul of the authorities, and his hearing, on a charge of assault, also received attention in the newspapers on the same date.


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Re: Tobago Street Police Station

Postby Socceroo » Thu Aug 06, 2009 7:22 pm

Love it H cracking story.

Have visions of tumbleweed blowing down Tobago Street and a couple of stallions tied up outside.

If Charging Thunder could'nt remember where he got smashed out his face then he would probably have been drinking in the Scotia.
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Re: Tobago Street Police Station

Postby HollowHorn » Thu Aug 06, 2009 8:19 pm

Full account of the Glasgow incident here:
http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=Csmf ... &resnum=10

All's well that ends well:

The show returned to Salford in 1903 - this time, with a 26-year-old Sioux warrior called Charging Thunder.
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Charging Thunder was an eyecatching figure in Edwardian England, seen here on a Manchester tram
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Charging Thunder (centre) was an impressive figure in his headdress and caught the eye of a young horse trainer called Josephine (front left)
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When the show rolled out of town, Charging Thunder and Josephine stayed and got married, first settling in Darwen before raising a family West Gorton.
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Charging Thunder's name was changed to George Edward Williams. After registering with the British immigration authorities, he found work at Belle Vue Circus looking after the elephants!
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When amateur historian Steve Coen made an appeal for descendants of Lakota indians in Manchester to come forward, two grandchildren of Charging Thunder were traced!
Rita Parr from Gorton, is Charging Thunder’s granddaughter. Although she never met him, Rita remembers being very proud as a child: "I'd say: my granddad was a Red Indian and he wore a big headdress!"
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According to his granddaughter, when Charging Thunder got drunk, he would go to Belle Vue and sleep off his hangover with his favourite elephant, Nelly!
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Charging Thunder died from pneumonia in 1929 at the age of 52. His body is buried in Gorton Cemetery alongside the body of his wife Josephine.
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BBC Manchester.

Further info from BBC Manchester:
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