Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Discuss everything about photography such as technique, post-processing, printing, etc

Moderators: John, Sharon, Fossil, Lucky Poet, crusty_bint, Jazza, dazza

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby Doorstop » Mon Jun 18, 2012 5:40 pm

I like him ... He says "Okie Dokie!"
User avatar
Doorstop
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 5998
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 9:07 am
Location: Guarding the Key to the Pie cupboard.

Laws Regarding Photography in Glasgow Parks

Postby bAzTNM » Wed Dec 12, 2012 7:11 pm

Hi! Just wondering what the laws are regarding taking (legal, nothing dodgy) photographs in public parks. Just that I came across this report from a few years back..

http://www.rutherglenreformer.co.uk/rut ... -27128504/

COUNCIL bosses have denied a disabled amateur photographer permission to take pictures in public parks.
Wheelchair-bound Alister Smith, of Kintore Towers, Whitlawburn, is a wildflower enthusiast and wanted to take pictures of blooms at Cambuslang Public Park.
However, the 54-year-old thought it best to seek permission from South Lanarkshire Council before attempting to snap the pictures.
Mr Smith, a former newsreader with BBC Scotland, thought obtaining permission would be a formality.

He was, therefore, stunned when he received a e-mail bluntly refusing the request.
Mr Smith said: “I decided to seek permission because 10 years ago a friend of mine, from Canada, was accosted by two rangers in Kelvingrove Park.
“They said he needed permission to take pictures.
“He told me about this so I decided to seek permission.
“I don’t want to go into the park and have park attendants coming up and thinking I’m a terrorist or a paedophile.
(continued on page three)
(continued from page one)
“I sent the email last week and the reply was quite categorical: just a plain ‘no.’ I was shocked.
“George Orwell was spot on.”
Mr Smith also wrote to Scotrail and Network Rail who were happy to accommodate his wish to take pictures at any of their stations.
He also wrote to Glasgow City Council and was told to identify parts of any parks he wants to photograph, what he wants to photograph and when he intends to take the pictures.
Mr Smith said all he wanted to do in his local park was take pictures of greenery.
“(South Lanarkshire) council’s decision means I will have to travel further a field which, in a wheelchair, can be quite awkward,” he added.
“I want to take pictures of the wild flowers, trees and plants. I’m particularly interested in wildflowers.
“Before I go to Glasgow and before I travel on the train I have to give 24 hours notice to Scotrail. I can travel on the buses as well but from time to time you’ll get problems.”
A spokesperson for South Lanarkshire Council said: “If a photographer takes a photograph of an individual that is the individual’s personal information and they must give consent to its use.
“It would be very difficult for the council to ensure that consent has been given therefore it opens the council to complaints and possible litigation.
“It is potentially an infringement of other people’s human rights as they have a right to privacy in their daily life and it is also a breach of the data protection act.”

I always take my pictures, or videos, when the place is empty.

Thanks!
bAzTNM
Second Stripe
Second Stripe
 
Posts: 238
Joined: Thu Jun 22, 2006 10:12 pm

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby Doorstop » Sun Jan 06, 2013 7:10 pm

I like him ... He says "Okie Dokie!"
User avatar
Doorstop
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 5998
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 9:07 am
Location: Guarding the Key to the Pie cupboard.

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby MacotheIsles » Mon Jan 07, 2013 7:36 am

I'm very dubious as to the supposition that having incidental people in one's photograph is a cardinal sin. Bollocks I say! I have my artwork online and the consensus amongst those of an artistic disposition is that unless a person is the surefire, deadcentre bullseye subject of the image that is for sale then it's ok: Incidental people are legal. If I had the financial depth of field I'd bombard every bloody council HQ in Scotland (starting with NLC) with a ballista loaded with Zenit EMs.
MacotheIsles
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:24 pm

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby HelenD » Mon Jan 07, 2013 9:39 am

Go careful when you get to SLC; they're paranoid and litigious. Fortunately, there's nothing worth photographing within their curtilege. :)
They boil them for 20 of their Earth minutes
User avatar
HelenD
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 459
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2012 7:27 pm

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby MacotheIsles » Mon Jan 07, 2013 11:20 am

HelenD wrote:Go careful when you get to SLC; they're paranoid and litigious. Fortunately, there's nothing worth photographing within their curtilege. :)


SLC? Hah! Their puny obfuscational PC baloney will be the first to be trampled underfoot by my rampaging balistas of truth, justice and liberation.
MacotheIsles
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 1147
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2006 8:24 pm

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby Dexter St. Clair » Thu Jan 17, 2013 9:50 pm

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-21065040

Aberdeen man admits taking 70,000 photos of women

An Aberdeen man has admitted taking more than 70,000 photos of women walking past his flat.

Oil worker Andrew Lawrence, 45, admitted breach of the peace by taking the shots without their permission.


The jig's up, guys.
"I before E, except after C" works in most cases but there are exceptions.
User avatar
Dexter St. Clair
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 6255
Joined: Tue Nov 16, 2004 9:54 pm

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby InkMan » Sat Jan 19, 2013 11:02 am

Taking photographs of kids you are working with is a nightmare due to the 'what if you capture a kid who you don't have official pictorial consent' quandary. The situation takes a fucking comical turn when a child; particularly one with minor learning or social difficulties, brings out a camera or camera phone.

Meanwhile as the likes of the SSSC (who take £30 a fucking year from me in a registration fee which will be interesting to read their cost breakdown) and others crawl up their own arses in an attempt to ensure confidentiality the real boogeymen and - lets not ignore this people - boogeywomen continue to perpetrate evil.

Shuggy
Cleggy you snickering floppy eared hound when courage is needed, you're ne'er around.
Those medals you wear on your moth-eaten chest should be there for bungling at which you are best.
User avatar
InkMan
Second Stripe
Second Stripe
 
Posts: 320
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2008 12:47 pm
Location: East Kilbride (For now!)

Re: Taking Photographs - The Legal Perspective

Postby Doorstop » Fri May 09, 2014 3:39 pm

I like him ... He says "Okie Dokie!"
User avatar
Doorstop
Third Stripe
Third Stripe
 
Posts: 5998
Joined: Tue May 22, 2007 9:07 am
Location: Guarding the Key to the Pie cupboard.

Previous

Return to Photography

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest