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Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 11:31 pm
by maccoinnich
Apologies if this has been done before — I almost can't believe it hasn't — but I'm not having any luck finding anything on search. Anyone know the story behind why there are gravestones used in the drystone walls, near the public toilets, in the Botanic Gardens?

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Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 6:54 pm
by Ronnie
Is there anything in the book " The Story of Glasgow Botanic Gardens" by Eric Curtis (Argyll Publishing)? The author was for many years the director of the gardens. You could try asking the current general manager (Ewen Donaldson - ewen.donaldson@ls.glasgow.gov.uk ) or the curator (Paul Matthews - paul.matthews@ls.glasgow.gov.uk ). Let us know what you find out.

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 8:24 pm
by Dot
Not sure whether I can help you at all. Perhaps someone at the Botanic Gardens would know the answer to this or you could ask someone at the Mitchell Library.
Think I read somewhere that there were old gravestones at Govan Old Parish Church built around 1884 or so.
It seems they had a collection some of which dated back to 10th and 11th centuries.
At some stage there was an old factory demolished in the area and it would appear that some of the gravestones were damaged and then taken to Glasgow University. So perhaps someone at the university could help.
Think the site was something like http://www.rcahms.gov.uk but if this doesn't work you can try google Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland.
Hope you get an answer as expect a lot of people are curious.

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:12 pm
by Monument
I can't believe Ronnie doesn't know the answer to this question 8O

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:27 pm
by Ronnie
Monument wrote:I can't believe Ronnie doesn't know the answer to this question 8O


I don't. 8O I could have had a guess, but I thought that pointing the OP to a trusted sources was a better option. I suppose I could have done the research myself, and then presented the answer to you all, but I'm tired after travelling back from Poland, and sometimes I don't want to be (or to look like) a know-it-all. :|

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 9:45 pm
by Alex Glass
This is a very interesting find.

I am sure someone in the Parks Department will know about the use of Headstones in the building of the wall. If I can find out anything I will let you know.

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 1:44 pm
by maccoinnich
Thanks for the suggestions - I may well try emailing them.

For what it's worth, when my mate and I noticed them, an older gentlemen came up to us and started talking. He was of the opinion that they might be from an old graveyard in Anderston, that was cleared away during the construction of the M8. Looking at old maps, he's certainly correct that there was a graveyard there, but whether some of the graves wound up in the botanics, I have no idea.

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 2:42 pm
by Monument
Ronnie wrote:
Monument wrote:I can't believe Ronnie doesn't know the answer to this question 8O


I don't. 8O I could have had a guess, but I thought that pointing the OP to a trusted sources was a better option. I suppose I could have done the research myself, and then presented the answer to you all, but I'm tired after travelling back from Poland, and sometimes I don't want to be (or to look like) a know-it-all. :|


It wasn't a criticism, just that it's near your house, and it's to do with graveyards, and you are a bit of a know it all in that department, in a good way :)

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 4:38 pm
by Ronnie
Thanks, M. I didn't take it as a criticism, and I just wanted to explain why I didn't - as might be expected - have the answer at the tip of my fingers.

Other M: You "may well try e-mailing them" :? You've raised this fabulous question ... we demand answers! :)

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Wed Sep 17, 2008 6:36 pm
by Monument
Ronnie wrote:
Other M: You "may well try e-mailing them" :? You've raised this fabulous question ... we demand answers! :)


Yes, I am looking forward to an answer to this one too!

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2008 10:16 pm
by mrsam
Just as a side point I was under the impression Grave plots and Stones belonged for inperpituity to the linear reletives of the people buried in the grave so that in Scotland graveyards are never cleared whereas in England they are cleared after 100 years?

A nice find of some Victorian gravestones well spotted.

Mr Sam

*Edit* are there more out there to be found Mr Glass can you shed light?

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2008 3:45 pm
by Its_a_gamp
Graveyards are definitely cleared, I have gone to a few only to find that they are now a housing estate!

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Fri Sep 19, 2008 10:54 pm
by Alex Glass
mrsam wrote:Just as a side point I was under the impression Grave plots and Stones belonged for inperpituity to the linear reletives of the people buried in the grave so that in Scotland graveyards are never cleared whereas in England they are cleared after 100 years?

A nice find of some Victorian gravestones well spotted.

Mr Sam

*Edit* are there more out there to be found Mr Glass can you shed light?


I am making some enquiries Mr Sam and will report back with any information

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 2:28 am
by Ronnie
maccoinnich wrote:Thanks for the suggestions - I may well try emailing them.


Any luck?

Re: Gravestones in the Botanics

PostPosted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 6:38 am
by HollowHorn
Recieved this from a friend in Australia:
Gees I am dredging the dim recesses of my memory here. I seem to rember that they were part of the "spoil" dug up during the excavations for a railway line in mid to late 1800s but I cannot be certain the bell ringing is far to faint