Christmas & New Year Traditions

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Postby HollowHorn » Sun Dec 17, 2006 10:50 pm

Steak & black pepper sauce on the day, whatever we feel like on NYD. At my Grannie's it ws always Steak Pie on NYD. Plenty of home made soup, too
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Postby onyirtodd » Sun Dec 17, 2006 10:54 pm

Josef wrote:
Smartalex wrote:I won't let a red-head be my first foot, an old tradition supposedly from my grandad. :?


Redheads used to be more or less banned from leaving the house after 11 p.m. in case they were first back in after 12.

Extremely bad luck :) .


There's a view that redheads are extremely bad luck 24x7x52 :wink:
238 to 127. All in all a good afternoon's work
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Postby My Kitten » Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:18 pm

we had steak pie for dinner late on hogmany.

Dad's birthday on new years day so we always had cake too :)
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Postby MacotheIsles » Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:17 am

I'd never heard that tradition about people leaving money on their window sills. I think it's an excellent idea and I would encourage everybody to do it this year. (ps - please PM me your addresses).

I always stay up for the Bells, stick on a Maudliners' LP, sip the Ginger Wine and hope someone'll knock on my door for once.
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Postby Dugald » Mon Dec 18, 2006 12:50 pm

Cleaning the house on Hogmanay, and staying up for the bells was always a part of the Ne'erday tradition in Govan, and right after the bells the streets would be full of people carrying all their 'first-footing' stuff. The bells themselves were a big deal too, all the boats on the Clyde, and there was usually a lot in Govan, would blow their horns, so there was never any mistake as to what the time was. The whisky, the coal, and the 'current bun', were a big part of what went on. Of course everybody didn't 'first-foot', some people had to stay home or there would have been no one to first foot. Our table in the living room was always adorned with shortbread, bun, and ginger wine.

The biggest change I have noticed regarding festive season traditions in Scotland, is the celebrating of Christmas. When I lived in Glasgow, unless it was a Sunday, Christmas day wasn't even a public holiday... the yards and factories were all at work. The Ne'erday celebration was very much the important event. I think there might have been a feeling in Scotland at that time, that there wasn't anything wrong in being different from the rest of the U.K., this feeling may even have been enjoyed. Now, it appears, Scotland is in step with the rest of the western world.
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Postby JayKay » Mon Dec 18, 2006 2:52 pm

Dugald wrote: The biggest change I have noticed regarding festive season traditions in Scotland, is the celebrating of Christmas. When I lived in Glasgow, unless it was a Sunday, Christmas day wasn't even a public holiday... the yards and factories were all at work. The Ne'erday celebration was very much the important event. I think there might have been a feeling in Scotland at that time, that there wasn't anything wrong in being different from the rest of the U.K., this feeling may even have been enjoyed. Now, it appears, Scotland is in step with the rest of the western world.


My folks used to say this too. Christmas was a holiday only in the religious sense - ie you had to go to church, but didn't get the day off work. Probably something to do with the ol' work ethic thing. Ne'ers day was for family, friends presents (etc)

A few years from now we'll probably be celebrating Thanksgiving :roll:
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Postby VGSmiles » Mon Dec 18, 2006 8:43 pm

onyirtodd wrote:
There's a view that redheads are extremely bad luck 24x7x52 :wink:


Hm.
Maybe I could grow out my natural hair colour again and visit crusty's parents? ::):


We used to have this little doll house that only came out of the attic for Christmas. Now my niece will get it as soon as she's old enough.
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Postby hazy » Mon Dec 18, 2006 9:08 pm

crusty_bint wrote:My families tradition was for my maw and da to get pished, have an argument, send me and my wee bro to bed with a bowl of peanuts each while the other older three fucked off out ::):
...happy days!

Did we share the same house when we were kids. ::):
Thank you. And why not.
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Postby Field Marshall Shug » Mon Dec 18, 2006 9:51 pm

Like Hollowhorn we did firstfooting and the lump of coal. This was in Renfrewshire.

A new tradition is to turn the telly off when 'Only An Excuse' comes on.
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Postby Dugald » Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:13 pm

JayKay wrote:My folks used to say this too. Christmas was a holiday only in the religious sense - ie you had to go to church, but didn't get the day off work. Probably something to do with the ol' work ethic thing. Ne'ers day was for family, friends presents (etc)

A few years from now we'll probably be celebrating Thanksgiving :roll:


I know what you mean JK, about Thanksgiving. Actually I'm surprised it hasn't yet reached the UK, where there seems to be an urgent desire to emulate the North American traditions.

Another big difference I recall between the American and Scottish Festive Season traditions is the custom in Scotland when I lived there, of not wishing people a "Happy New Year" until after the bells, whereas here in Canada, it is common practice to wish people a "Happy New Year" before the bells. When I worked in Glasgow for example, management reps. were always at the entrance to greet employees on their return to work after the Ne'erday break.

Cheers, dugald.
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Postby HollowHorn » Mon Dec 18, 2006 10:21 pm

Field Marshall Shug wrote:A new tradition is to turn the telly off when 'Only An Excuse' comes on.

Arf arf.
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Postby Alex Glass » Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:29 pm

So what about tipping the Postman, Binmen etc.

My dad always gave a bottle of whiskey to the Postman and usually a bottle and some cans to the Binmen.

We usually give them a card with money. The Paperboy gets an extra tip at Christmas.

Are there any others that you tip at this time of year and what do you give?
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Postby red_kola » Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:39 pm

I'll give my postman a tip: try actually attempting to deliver an item before writing me a 'sorry you were out' card... Bastards :twisted:
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Postby Socceroo » Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:42 pm

red_kola wrote:I'll give my postman a tip: try actually attempting to deliver the item before writing me a 'sorry you were out' card... Bastards :twisted:



::): Aye, i got a card through the door the other day saying that a packet was too big for the letter box. I then opened the door on him as he was walking down the stairs.
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Postby MacotheIsles » Sat Dec 23, 2006 10:44 pm

Never the same postman twice here.

Tipping the binmen was a bone of contention with me when I worked as a roadsweeper. I'd be on my feet for literally 11 hours a day sometimes - soaked and freezing too in the winter months and the only extra that I got at Christmas was more soggy wrapping paper in the gutters. Meanwhile the binmen got it all.

Bloody playboys!
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