Washington Street School.

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Re: Washington Street.

Postby The Egg Man » Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:47 pm

Looks like RM Easdale are still there

http://www.rmeasdale.com/index.htm
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby robertpool » Sat Jan 21, 2012 1:13 am

Yes they are still there. During the murder enquiry in to the death of the Polish? girl in the church on North Street, when the guy was arrested he originaly gave his ame as Patrick McLachlan who was the yard foreman at Easdales'. Pat got a visit shortly afterwards from the boys in blue 8O

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Pat McLachlan of R.M. Easdale & Co Ltd, McAlpine Street, Anderston, Glasgow by Robert Pool's Glasgow Collection, on Flickr

"it wisny me!" he said in a broad Irish accent
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby duck » Wed Mar 21, 2012 2:15 pm

I had family living at 59 Washington Street between 1901 and 1910. In the Post Office Directory of 1912, the Anderston Bonding Company and Johnstone's Stores are listed at this address. However, on the Ward Roll of 1913 there are no fewer than 53 houses listed for No 59.
Anybody any idea how this could be? Was the bonding company perhaps converted to flats?
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby robertpool » Wed Mar 21, 2012 6:49 pm

the bond was on the other side of the road ... even numbers ie 44. Click on photo and view in 'original size'

Bobby

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1899 W. P. Lowrie & Co Ltd, Bonded Warehouse, 44 Washington Street, Glasgow. Proposal for Loan

Lowrie sold out to Buchanans and the bond remained Buchanans which then became Slater, Rodgers & Co untill it closed in the early 1990's. Buchanan moved to Stepps and after they left it became known as 'Buchanan Busines Park'.

Original Slate Advertisment which l took from the building. 3ft X 2 ft and weighs a lot let me tell you :)

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James Buchanan & Co Ltd, Whisky Distillers, Cumbernauld Road, Stepps, Glasgow by Robert Pool's Glasgow Collection, on Flickr
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby duck » Wed Mar 21, 2012 9:34 pm

Sorry to be a thicko Bobby but I don't quite understand. In all the PO directories up to 1911/12 there is an Anderston Bonding Co at No 59. Taking just a couple of samples in 1903/04 and 1906/07 there is a Lowrie's at No 30. In the 1911/12 directory there is still the ABC at 59 whilst at Nos 46 and 30 there is the Buchanan's you mentioned and again at 30, Lowrie's.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby robertpool » Thu Mar 22, 2012 12:28 pm

Having looked at the PO directory l see that at number 59 there was the Anderston Bonding Company, Robert Gilchrist (grain storekeeper) and Robert McNish & Co (wine & spirit merchants) who also had an office at no 55 (not 53). I wonder if ABC was a small bond owned by McNish who were originally in Dunlop Street. Lowrie’s address at number 30 would have been the official entrance but the building ran all the way from number 44 to the Washington Street School at number 12. Even after Buchanan’s took over Lowrie they still used the Lowrie name as it was an established branded name. John Ramsay Distillers occupied part of the building and had the address of number 44.

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1894 Robert McNish & Co, 92 Dunlop Street, Glasgow

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McNish Whiskey, 45 Washington Street, Glasgow

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1965 Robert McNish & Co Ltd, Glasgow Advertisment

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Robert Macnish & Co Ltd Whisky Label 02

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Robert Macnish & Co Ltd Whisky Label

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James Buchanan & Co Ltd Whisky Label

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W. P. Lowrie & Co Ltd, 44 Washington Street, Glasgow. Whisky Label
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby banjo » Thu Mar 22, 2012 4:35 pm

robert,strange to see mcnish and macnish there.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby robertpool » Fri Mar 23, 2012 2:57 pm

This may help explain it. I have highlighted it in Red

Bobby

Robert McNish & Co, wholesale wine & spirit Merchants.

Mr Robert McNish was the senior partner and founder of this extensive establishment. He was widely known all over Scotland and England as a shrewd businessman, whose career has been distinguished for unimpeachable integrity and upright dealing.

Mr McNish was born in Kilwinning, Ayrshire, he moved with his parents to West Kilbride where he received his education. He came to Glasgow in 1858 with a good education and procured employment with the well known firm Matthew Algie & Co., tea merchants. He remained with the firm for 5 years and it was here that he got his training in business.

Robert next became a partner with Thomas Henderson for 5 years before starting out on his own as a wholesale tea, wine & spirit merchant. As a blender of whisky McNish soon became well known in Scotland and England for his special "Doctor" blend of old scotch, which did an increasing export trade. His two sons John and George both good linguists, and as such did most of the foreign correspondence connected with the business. George when on to retail and owned the Smiddy Bar, Dumbarton Road. The two sons travelled all over the world selling McNish whisky including the Doctor blend.

Robert McNish built a very fine villa at Seamill, West Kilbride where he retired, in his spare time he was a conservative in politics, he was a member of the Incorporation of Weavers and a member of the Merchants House, he was a loyal and devoted Freemason.

The Grand Macnish became the fine Scotch Whisky that it is today because of a belief held by Robert McNish back in 1863. Being a hard-headed Scot, he set about concocting a lighter whisky which would have a distinctive appearance. After much sampling, a recipe was found using over 40 single whiskies. The percentage of each used varied according to weight, flavour and aroma, the resultant whisky being much lighter than straight malt, although retaining the exquisite flavour of the finest Highland Whiskies. In 1887 he was joined in the firm by his two sons, John and George. Trade was expanding and the original store in York Street, Glasgow, where Robert had sold China and Indian Tea, Virginia Tobacco and Scotch Whisky, was found too small hence new premises were opened at 92 Dunlop Street. The laying down of large stocks of maturing whisky was a costly affair and to finance this operation the McNish family decided in 1908 to form their activities into a limited company.

In 1904 Robert McNish died and John, who had a flair for salesmanship and entertaining, made his headquarters in London where he was in constant touch with overseas as well as domestic buyers. George, a shrewd canny Scot, stayed in Glasgow and acted as an excellent foil for John. Between 1900 and 1914, sales of Scotch throughout the world increased enormously and the McNish Company, together with many other Scotch Whisky merchants, shared in this prosperity.

When World War I broke out, George, always a military man and holding a commission in Glasgow’s own regiment, the Highland Light Infantry, immediately reported for service in France. He served throughout the War from 1914 to 1918 and, as Colonel George McNish; his meritorious services were tangibly recognised in 1919 when he was awarded the C.B.E. by H.M. King George V.

On his return to civilian life he resumed his activities in the sale of Macnish Scotch, but since he was a man of boundless energy he also interested himself in numerous charities and local government, and became a Deputy Lieutenant of the City of Glasgow as well as a Justice of the Peace. He died in September 1943 at the ripe old age of 77 after 50 years with the company. His brother John died two years later.

1927, after lengthy negotiations, the old McNish Company was purchased by Corby Distilleries but continued to operate independently from Glasgow. In later years Hiram-Walker Group acquired a majority interest in Corby Distilleries and finally in 1991 Grand MacNish was acquired by MacDuff International and since then has gone from strength to strength.

The choice of the name Grand Macnish came about quite simply. Many of Colonel George McNish’s friends, when commenting on the distinctive quality of MacNish would, in the Scots tongue, say it was a “Grand” whisky. Thus the term was adopted and used as part of the brand name, which is today to many thousands, a guarantee of quality.

The name “McNish” was the correct spelling of the family name and was only altered to MacNish for ease of pronunciation in all corners of the world. The McNish clan is a sept of the Clan MacGregor. A sept means a clan in the sense that the members of it belong to a branch of a race or family and as such have the right to wear the tartan, etc, of this clan.

The clan motto “Forti Nihil Dificile” which means “To the strong nothing is difficult” encapsulates the spirit of the McNish family. In old Grand Macnish advertisements this spirit and dedication to quality was represented by a leaping salmon, a Scottish symbol of both quality and a desire to achieve one’s goal against the odds.

GRAND MACNISH TASTING NOTES – “THE WHISKY BIBLE 2004”

“Grand MacNish (89)

Nose:22. Young, feral and lively. Wild grain but shackled well by some raw malt which combines lavender and gorse for a wonderfully floral blend
Taste: 23. I adore the way the grain and malt spark off each other. This is classic stuff
Finish: 22. A rare display of Speyside grassiness late on in a blend: remains sweet and clean save for some late toffee
Balance: 22. For those who prefer their whisky with character, eccentricity and attitude rather than water. “
Grand Macnish Original Tasting Notes
Nose: Lavendar, heather floral
Palate: Honey, sweet, full bodied
Finish: Grassy, sweet toffee

Grand Macnish 12 Year Old Tasting Notes
Nose: Sherry notes and light smokiness
Palate: Spices, roast nuts
Finish: Oak and cocoa

Other Macnish Scotch Whisky Bottlings
Grand Macnish Blended Malt
Grand Macnish 12 Year Old Blended Malt.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby banjo » Fri Mar 23, 2012 7:15 pm

thank you robert.i found that a very interesting read.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby duck » Sat Mar 24, 2012 9:41 am

Really interesting stuff.
No 59 is still puzzling me, though I think I'm beginning to see that street numbers weren't constant-is that correct? This photograph from Scran is marked as 59 Washington Street in a 1960's photo; a building built in the 1850' s for Martin Hoyle & Co, sugar refiners. In the PO Directory for the period it is thus marked until the 1880's when No 59 seems to disappear, only to resurface in 1900 as The Anderston Bonding Company. Until then a certain Brown Brothers seem to have most of the nearest numbers, 35 to 45 whilst Mrs Torlay is at No 55 and Robert McBrown at 63.
As I would have thought most of the buildings themselves would have been contant why did numbers flit in and out?

And I'm still wanting to know how come no 59 in the Valuation Rolls could have more than 50 houses at one address!

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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby Dexter St. Clair » Sat Mar 24, 2012 10:54 am

duck wrote:Really interesting stuff.

And I'm still wanting to know how come no 59 in the Valuation Rolls could have more than 50 houses at one address!




No images from SCRAN please. They actively protect their copyright.
"I before E, except after C" works in most cases but there are exceptions.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby duck » Sat Mar 24, 2012 11:15 am

I actually got it from www.europeana.eu
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby robertpool » Sat Mar 24, 2012 1:21 pm

Washington Street in 1962

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no 27 Part of Harvie & McGavin's building was incorporated into the Menzies Hotel
no 45 Robert McNish (The Grand Macnish) building is now the The Royal Scottish Pipe Band Association
no 79 A.D.Fraser's building was occupied by Clyde Factors (Electrical) Ltd from 1968 to 1989
no 44 was still occupied by W.P.Lowrie
no 59 Connal & Co Ltd, Storekeepers (next door to Easdales)

Although the VR lists 50 houses l think it's a list of 50 occupants at 1 address and some will be sharing accomodation. I can only think that in 1913 there may have been a tenement type building or converted warehouse with work shops or/and offices at the bottom of the building as the Valuation Roll shows that at no 59 there was also the Union Transit Co, Thom & Cameron – distillers, John Begg – distillers and Robert McNish – Whisky Merchants.

Washington Street through the years.

1923 Company Letterhead

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1923 Union Transit Company, 381 Argyle Street, Glasgow

1933 Advertisment

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1933 Union Transit Co, 381 Argyle Street, Glasgow Advertisment

1985

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Clyde Factors (Electrical) Ltd, 79 Washington Street, Glasgow.

1890

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1890 James Murray, 31 & 33 Washington Street and 6 & 8 Brown Street, Glasgow GPOD Advertisment

1882

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1882 Chisholm & Law, Saracen Tube Works, Washington Street and 12 Waterloo Street, Glasgow

1960's

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1960 W. P. Lowrie & Co Ltd, 44 Washington Street, Glasgow. Ashtay

1989

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Clyde Factors (Electrical) Ltd, 79 Washington Street, Glasgow.

1856

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1856 William Napier sen, 45 Washington Street, Glasgow GPOD Advertisment

1931

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1931 William Corry & Co Ltd, 41 Washington Street, Glasgow

1893

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1893 James Murray & Co, 8 Anderston Quay & 31 to 33 Washington Street, Glasgow Advertisment

1933

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1933 Brown & Co, 73 to 85 McAlpine St and 31 to 33 Washington Street, Glasgow Advertisment

1932

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1932 J. & R. Sodgrass Ltd, Washington Mills, Washington Street, Glasgow

1855

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1855 John Lynass jnr, Washington Waste Mills, 60 Washington Street, Glasgow GPOD Advertisment
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby Dexter St. Clair » Sat Mar 24, 2012 4:41 pm

I could have sworn you said
duck wrote:Really interesting stuff.
This photograph from Scran is marked as 59 Washington Street in a 1960's photo;
"I before E, except after C" works in most cases but there are exceptions.
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Re: Washington Street School.

Postby Josef » Sat Mar 24, 2012 4:53 pm

Dexter St. Clair wrote:I could have sworn you said
duck wrote:Really interesting stuff.
This photograph from Scran is marked as 59 Washington Street in a 1960's photo;


You know when you've been Dextered.
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