HG Movie Critique.

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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Bridie » Thu Sep 10, 2009 6:46 am

Mori wrote:On STV tonight 10:30pm



Watched this on TV last night. Totally mesmorising,very sad but not totally depressing, close to home - I was just married when the dustbin strike was going on. The thing that stood out the most was the incredible acting of the youngsters in the film - the lead actor, the young teenage girl, the wee "animal boy". Where did they find them? Brilliant film.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby engineer » Mon Sep 14, 2009 9:16 pm

seen adventureland at the weekend....not a great film but still pretty cool and amusing in a lo-fi way.
and the soundtrack has husker du & the replacements among others :D
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sun Sep 27, 2009 10:55 am

Image .. Image

Telstar tells the story of British songwriter and music producer Joe Meek (played by Con O'Neill), whose ground-breaking recording techniques and otherworldly pop records made him the premier independent pop producer in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The film skips Meek's childhood and instead takes us from the beginning of his partnership with songwriter Geoff Goddard (Tom Burke) in 1961 to the bizarre circumstances of his death in 1967.

The majority of the film takes place in Meek's makeshift recording studio, above a leather goods shop on the Holloway Road. Aside from his fiery temper and bizarre eccentricities, Telstar also explores Meek's homosexuality, most notably through his obsession with peroxide recording artist Heinz (JJ Feild).

The movie as a whole relishes in a terrific cast that includes the likes of James Corden (as drummer Clem Cattini), Kevin Spacey (as financial backer Major Banks), Pam Ferris (as Meek's long-suffering landlady, Mrs Shenton), Ralf Little (as Chas Hodges, later of Chas and Dave) and Justin Hawkins as Screaming Lord Sutch, as well as several cameos by a few conteporary comedians as well as many of the actual musicians featured in the film. The music sequences are hugely entertaining and strikingly original, particularly during the signature track, Telstar.

Con O'Neill is a veritable tour de force as Meek, his oddly strangled voice and manic behaviour clearly suggesting that there's some sort of link between genius and borderline insanity, a theme which is contained within the film given it's slightly disjointed and chaotic appearance (I'm not sure if that was entirely intentional on the part of the director but it undoubtedly adds to the chronicilisation of the demise of main protagonist Joe Meek's tragic and ultimately disastrous downfall into what was undoubtedly a full blown amphetamine fuelled psychosis).

I found this movie, despite it's obvious and sometimes glaring cinematographic foibles, completely enthralling and thoroughly, thoroughly enjoyable.

Well worth a watch and strongly recommended.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Lone Groover » Sat Oct 03, 2009 6:12 am

What 'e said ! 8)

Eccentric ? Pilled up maniac !!!! :mrgreen:
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby HollowHorn » Sat Oct 03, 2009 6:35 pm

Doorstop wrote:as financial backer Major Banks

Yir havin' a laff! ::):
Keep up the good work slim, your reviews are always worth a read.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sun Oct 04, 2009 8:25 am

:D I do m'best.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:44 am

Image ... Image

Looking For Eric.

It's not a comedy exactly, but I felt it 's definitely Ken Loach's lightest, happiest film for some time and still managed to make me smile on a fair few occasions.

A wacky if erratic and self-conscious buddy movie about a depressed middle-aged postman and Manchester United fan called Eric Bishop who suffers a breakdown brought on by family troubles and his illicit and not inconsiderable consumption of his stepson's weed supply. In this fragile, delusional condition, he is visited by his great, barrel-chested, monobrowed hero, Eric Cantona who thorough his enigmatic (if not at times utterly impregnable) gift for poetry, symbolism and impenetrable French accent tries to lift him from his mire of depression.

That is perhaps a problem. When the inscrutible Gaul delivered his famous line at the press conference about the trawler and the sardines (nostalgically reprised over the final credits) he did it with glacial slowness, so that reporters would not miss a word. It seems that Cantona now has different ideas about delivery. Since he is a fully fledged legend, professional actor and indeed this film's executive producer, it can't be easy, even for Loach, to tell him how to speak the dialogue or play himself. So Cantona is allowed to throw his lines away: he gabbles them, he burbles them, he murmurs them, as it were, into his upturned collar. Sometimes he speaks French, sometimes English in a very heavy accent, and it isn't easy to tell which is which.

If you can take this minor flaw in you stride then it shouldn't detract from your enjoyment of this enthralling little dram-com as he always has a mischievous twinkle, a cheeky touch of self-satire, mixed in with his unfaked and in fact unfakable amour propre. When the awed Bishop asks Cantona what he did during his suspension, and Cantona replies that he learned the trumpet, and proceeds to take one out and play, it is a gloriously surreal moment.

The part of Eric Bishop is also interesting casting. Steve Evets is a jobbing performer and former musician who is one of those many people who were once in the Fall and, like so many, fell out with lead singer Mark E Smith.

He doesn't look like an actor, with actor-ish mannerisms; he seems like a real, likable guy with real emotions, and his perennial stunned expression of "what-am-I-doing-here-and-what-is-going-on?" is very appropriate and adds to the realism of the parts of the experience outside of the main protagonists breakdown/weed induced psychosis.

An uneasy then solid bond occurs between 'Eric and Eric' and the pair swap tips on how to cope with the dark times and reminisce over Cantona’s goals, cueing several stirring montages of balls hitting the back of the net. Eric might tire a little of the Frenchman’s gnomic advice (‘I’m still getting over the seagulls one!’), but an amusing, touching friendship emerges that slowly nudges a suicidal man back towards the solidarity of the workplace, the family and the terraces – a fading solidarity that the film both celebrates and laments.

Without giving too much of the plot away Eric is dragged into a darker side of local life by his stepson becoming involved with local drug-dealing lowlife and I have to say his strategy for removing himself from his predicament and keeping his family and burgeoning 'matters amour' with his ex-wife (and erstwhile love of his life)intact are somewhat unexpected and raised more than a little belly laugh in this locale.

If you're a fan of the sort of gritty, real-life humour that Loach has been famed for in the past then grab a squiz at this recent offering .. I don't think you'll be dissappointed .. quite the contrary.
Last edited by Doorstop on Sun Oct 11, 2009 4:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Josef » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:55 am

"I am not a man, I am Cantona"

Image



Great stuff, DS. The rest of you trailer-posting shower take note, btw. :twisted:
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:57 am

:oops: Shucks.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Josef » Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:18 am

Doorstop wrote:So Cantona is allowed to throw his lines away: he gabbles them, he burbles them, he murmurs them, as it were, into his upturned collar. Sometimes he speaks French, sometimes English in a very heavy accent, and it isn't easy to tell which is which.

The part of Eric Bishop is also interesting casting. Steve Evets is a jobbing performer and former musician who is one of those many people who were once in the Fall and, like so many, fell out with lead singer Mark E Smith.


Appropriately enough, I remember reading an interview with the magnificent MES where he railed against lyric sheets being included with albums, along the lines of 'These modern bands are a disgrace. Elvis never had lyric sheets - he deliberately mumbled lyrics.'
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:22 am

The great circle eh? Wait long enough and your quotes will come back to haunt you. :D
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby DickyHart » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:32 pm

zombieland

hilarious fun, and a brilliant cameo!!
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Doorstop » Sat Oct 17, 2009 5:38 pm

Image ... Image

Surrogates.

I was looking forward to getting a copy of this, Bruce Willis's new offering detailing a nightmarish future originally detailed in the Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele graphic novel of the same name, and while the big screen version doesn't come close to the dystopian vision of the future layed out in the original I have to say I wasn't completely disappointed.

In this brave new world humans plug themselves into an interface chair and take control of an android (their Surrogate) which, with varying levels of feedback varying from sight and sound to full sensory stimulation depending on which model you can afford to purchase, allows you to go out into the world to complete the everyday tasks that we all take for granted, and perform the majority of them with heightened speed, strength and agility along with disgustingly perfect good looks.

It strikes a chord given the whole 'terrorism is everywhere' threat from the media these days and the populace in this offering have taken it to its logical extremes and refuse to allow themselves to be placed in any danger whatsoever by using their surrogates for everything from stepping out to the shops to carrying out warfare on other nations' armies of Surrogates.

Crime is almost unheard of due to the fact that humans who refuse to use a Surrogate are enclaved in ghettos and those who do use their android are under constant surveillance making any nefarious activity pointless. However, when a Surrogate is destroyed simultaneously killing its user remotely, the Willis character is forced to investigate what is supposed to be an impossible set of circumstances.

Cue the main vehicle of the movie as the Willis (FBI agent Greer) Surrogate is destroyed and the flesh and blood WIllis is forced from his insular environment and out into the real world to do his stuff as an FBI agent.

What rolls out is a fairly clean, tight film that looks great (I especially liked the weird, scrubbed, polished look of the Surrogates and the little, subtle background touches that reinforce the unreality of this futuristic 'hyper-reality' - look out for the 'Football Monday' poster) and with the requisite number of car crashes and helicopter explosions to keep the momentum rolling when perhaps the story becomes a little thin.

It had definite overtones of 'A.I Artificial Intelligence', 'Minority Report' and 'The Matrix' but without many of the cerebral overtones of same. There were many plot holes and flaws in logic in this film but none of them are too terminal and if you set out expecting a sci-fi flick that doesn't bear close scrutiny intellectually then you'll probably find this a pleasant and entertaining way to wile away 90 minutes.
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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Mori » Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:27 pm

Disapointed wi surrogates.

havent seen the 1st part of this but this one looks no too bad, out next week, auld wullie still wieldin eez pistols, kidin oan eez irush. 8)

Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day

The Boondock Saints II: All Saints Day is the much-anticipated sequel to the indie cult classic, The Boondock Saints. The film is the continuation of writer/director Troy Duffy’s tough, stylized cutting edge saga of the MacManus brothers (Norman Reedus, Sean Patrick Flanery). The two have been in deep hiding with their father, Il Duce (Billy Connolly), in the quiet valleys of Ireland, far removed from their former vigilante lives. When word comes that a beloved priest has been killed by sinister forces from deep within the mob, the brothers return to Boston to mount a violent and bloody crusade to bring justice to those responsible. With a new partner in crime (Clifton Collins Jr., Star Trek) and a sexy FBI operative (Julie Benz, TV’s “Dexter”) hot on their trail…the Saints are back!
View less Genre:Action and Adventure, Drama
Director:Troy Duffy
Cast:Sean Patrick Flanery, Norman Reedus, Billy Connolly, Clifton Collins, Julie Benz

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Re: HG Movie Critique.

Postby Toby Dammit » Mon Oct 26, 2009 11:30 pm

I was at a press screening of this new 3D movie tonight. It opens in a couple of weeks and co-stars the likes of Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, Bob Hoskins and Lesley Manville. As it uses motion capture technology, unlike most animations it uses not only their voices but their physical performances too. Jim Carrey stars as Scrooge, and as such does a tremendous vocal impersonation of Alastair Sim.

I was expecting to be not very impressed by the thing, and it has to be said I'm not at all a Carrey fan but I was quite blown away by most of it from the first frame on. It really does take a tale so well known as to be almsot irritatingly familiar and breath fresh life into through technique, breathtaking direction and superb performances. The 3D is magical but not at all laboured, but I found it hard to imagin what it would be like without the process (screened say on Saturday afternoon telly).

The evocation of an 1840's London is stunning and some of the best moments are simply as the camera zooms and swoops through the vast virtual city scapes (the historically innacurate Palace of Westminster which is used on the poster never appears in the movie, though the medieval London Bridge does). One of the other aspects I liked was Marley's ghost (brilliantly portrayed by Gary Oldman). When I first read the book as a child I found this apparition the most terrifying thing in it, only to see it portrayed in film after film as something merely mournfull and even comic. Here it is the specter I remembered, utterly and unsettlingly insane and meanacing.

Image

The biggest hit with the many children in the huge audience at the Empire Leicester Square was the Ghost of Christmas Past (also played by Carrey), they squealed with delight as soon as he appeared and were almost cheering his every move. Indeed all the Spirits are quite magnificently realised, again bringing a new life to the characters, though my only quam came during a hearse carrige chase scene towards the end with the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, which went on far too long and simply seemed to be kinetic for the sake of it as it showed off the 3D so well.

At only 96 minutes though the film fairly flies by with no annoying stops for musical numbers, and there was even a bonus of a superb 3D trailer for Tim Burton's version of ALICE IN WONDERLAND. There's a shot of the Cheshire Cat which really leaps right out of the screen which had all the little kids crying out in sheer delight and wonder, very sweet. Having seen this tonight and DISTRICT 9 not so long ago it feels like cinema can now show us just about anything with utter realism.
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