The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

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The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Sat Jan 31, 2009 11:09 pm

Ronnie posted this in 'what's On' recently:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=8233


I found this in a book I bought to-day called 'Old Glasgow Club (transactions) 1918-1029 vol IV':
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Mungo's Holy Well, Saracen, Gallowgate: 1870-1900:
St. Mungo's Holy Well was located in the courtyard of the Saracen's Head Inn on the Gallowgate.
It was also known as Little St. Mungo's Well, named after. Glasgow's patron saint. He is believed to have met Christian converts, and St. Columba, near to its location. The well has not survived redevelopment of the area.
In the early 20th century it was considered to be the oldest surviving draw-well in Glasgow, and at one time it would have been a major source of water. Its circular wall was capped by a heavy wooden lid.


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The Lady Well is a holy well in Glasgow in Scotland.
When Christianity came to Britain, pagan holy and healing wells were aggressively rededicated to the Virgin Mary and other saints while remaining places of Old Religion practice. Also known as 'Our Lady's Well', Glasgow's Ladywell is an artesian spring noted on early city maps and can be reliably assumed to predate the city. It lay just outside the city wall and Drygate Port in medieval times and will have refreshed Romans travelling the old Carntyne Highway east-west between forts along the Antonine Wall. Today it is erroneously believed to have been sunk for use of commoners denied access to a nearby Priest's Well, and/or to have been capped in the early 1800s out of fears of pollution or plague.
In fact, its wellhead was jointly rebuilt by the Merchants House and City Council in 1835-6 for enclosure in a new wall when the Fir Park behind it was turned into a gardened burial ground. The Ladywell was still in public use while most wells in Glasgow were closed, after fresh water piped from Loch Katrine transformed the city's health and sanitation in the 1860s. An old article says the Ladywell was the last public well to be closed but gives no date. The classical wellhead installed by the 1836 restoration bears no resemblance to the original - an open round one - and remains there today. The current lintel stone (its second) notes the 1836 rebuild and another by the Merchant's House in 1874. A plaque commemorates its most recent refurbishment by Tennant Caledonian Breweries in 1983. The Ladywell remains capped.

Wikipedia

THE LADY WELL
Ladywell Street, Glasgow.
This well has been restored and rebuilt, as it bears. I have not been
able to find any drawing showing the original structure. I cannot
possibly imagine that the present building (fig. 11) bears any resemblance
to the former, it being now strictly classic in design and detail. The
cross and urn are of cast metal. "Lady Love" or "Lady Well," so
called after a fountain at the bottom of {he Craigs (now included in the
Necropolis), sacred in Popish times to the Virgin.—Merchants' House
of Glasgow.

Listed Building Report

The Lady Well 1955:
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The Lady Well 1960:
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Lord Provost Michael Kelly after unveiling the rebuilt Lady Well
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Glasgow Cathedral.
This well is curiously situated, and points, I think, to the spring having been well known and possibly regarded with feelings of veneration before the building of the present structure. It is exceedingly simple, the window at the back being as much the result of accident as design in its relationship to the well.


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ST. ENOCH or THENEW, mother of St Kentigern—Glasgow. The following
references to this well are taken from the Glasgow Burgh Records :—" 16th
March 1573.—Johne Blakwod is fund in the wrang, and amerchiament of
court for del vying doun of the erd besyde St Thenewis Woll, quhilk is commcran,
purposyng to appropriat the samyn to himself, and dwme gevin
heir upon." " 13th June 1595.—The baillies ordanes the maister of work
to repair the brig at St Tinewis Well besyde the Greyn to be ane futte
rod in tyme cumying." Macgeorge, in his History of Old Glasgow says—" It was shaded by an old tree, which drooped over it, and which
remained till the end of the last century. On this tree the devotees who
frequented the well were accustomed to nail as thanks-offerings small bits
of tin-iron, probably manufactured for the purpose by a craftsman in the
neighbourhood, representing the parts of the body supposed to have been
cured by virtue of the blessed spring, a practice still common in Roman
Catholic countries. The late Mr Robert Hart told me that he had been
informed by an old man, a Mr Thomson, who had resided in the neighbourhood,
that at the end of last century or the beginning of the present
he had recollected this well being cleaned out, and of seeing picked out
from the debris at the bottom several of those old votive offerings which
had dropped from the tree, the stump of which at that time was still
standing."


St Thenew's Well is shown (in the area NS 589 648) S of St Thenew's Chapel (NS56SE 26 q.v.) on Renwick's plan. Walker quotes references to this well in Glasgow burgh records of 1573 and 1595. Macgeorge states that a tree stood besi de the well, and pieces of metal were inserted into it as offerings. Some of these were recovered when the well was being cleaned out at the end of the 18th century. (This area is now built up.)
J R Walker 1883; A Macgeorge 1880; R Renwick and J Lindsay 1921.

http://www.rcahms.gov.uk/pls/portal/can ... link=44288

For future consideration:
The Marriage Well, Shettleston


Arms Well (on the Green), Glasgow

"HOLY WELLS" IN SCOTLAND. BY J. RUSSEL WALKER, ARCHITECT.
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Re: Glasgow's Holy Wells

Postby My Kitten » Sat Jan 31, 2009 11:46 pm

HollowHorn wrote:Ronnie posted this in 'what's On' recently:
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=8233

I found this in a book I bought to-day called 'Old Glasgow Club (transactions) 1918-1029 vol IV':


1920-1921 Old Glasgow Club Transactions can be found online here

Im off to read what all those interesting jpgs say
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Re: Glasgow's Holy Wells

Postby Josef » Sun Feb 01, 2009 8:53 am

Thanks, HH.

It was mentioned at the talk that the Cathedral was built to house St Mungo's well (with the lecturer's reasoning being that if you were setting out to build a Cathedral, you certainly wouldn't build it there otherwise), which was news to me if not to many of the people on here, and the papers above seem to be of the same opinion.

The bloke had tried to get some photos of the Saracen's Head well, but was too feart to make his way through the colourful locals hanging out round the back. Although, as it turned out during the subsequent audience participation session on ned-avoidance, that he'd being looking in the wrong place anyway. :D
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Re: Glasgow's Holy Wells

Postby MungoDundas » Sun Feb 01, 2009 10:37 pm

.

Although no longer in use, I was told that there is still a well within the
Cardowan Creameries factory at Holywell Street in Camlachie. My dad
used to say that the water percolating down through the Eastern Necroplolis
gave the margarine its body.
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby Sharon » Tue Feb 03, 2009 11:54 am

After HGs visit to the polish club (apparently theres another polish club at st georges x) my taxi driver on the way home told me a wee story about a white witch wanting to sell healing water from the Lady Well - although according to wikipedia it is capped so that could be a tricky endeavour!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Well

His version of this story had more detail... unfortunately alcohol provides a buffer between the detail and the recall! :?
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Tue Feb 03, 2009 9:18 pm

The Marriage Well:
Kenmuir bank is a steep acclivity which rises directly from the margin of the Clyde to the height of some sixty or seventy feet. It is a wild and bosky scene, covered with a picturesque profusion of timber, and is the habitat of flowers innumerable. The weaver herbalists of Camlachie and Farkhead find it a perfect storehouse of medicinal rarities; and on Sundays they may be seen in sickly groups prying into every green recess in search of plants which old Culpepper would have loved for their rare qualities, or carrying them home in odorous bundles, confident of having obtained a mastery over "all the ills that flesh is heir to." The botanist may also occasionally be seen lurking here, vasculum in hand, or on beaded knee examining the structure of some strange flower. But even the mere general lover of flowers will here find much to reward his attention. At present the May-flower (caitha palustris), the wild hyacinth, the craw-flower of Tannahill, the red campion (lychnis dioica), the odorous woodruff (asperula oderata), the globe-flower or lucken gowan (trollius europceus), and many others are in full bloom, and so thickly strewn that even as the poet says. At the foot of the bank, near its upper extremity, there is a fine spring, which is known by the name of the "Marriage Well," from a couple of curiously united trees which rise at its side and fling their shadows over its breast. To this spot, in other days, came wedding parties, on the day after marriage, to drink of the crystal water, and, in a cup of the mountain-dew, to pledge long life and happiness to the loving pair whom, on the previous day, old Hymen had made one in the bands which death alone can sever. After imbibing a draught of the sacred fluid from the cup of Diogenes, we rest a brief space on the margin of the well

http://www.glasgowhistory.co.uk/Books/R ... armyle.htm

The riverside path along the banks ends at Kenmuir Woods at the place called the "Dooket" at the foot of the wood. Shy bridesmaids and their groomsmen used to visit after a wedding to drink the mystic waters of the marriage well. Certain places about the woods were well adapted for picnics, etc. After tea and refreshments the lads and lassies passed hours in amusement trying to step over the well and anyone soiling the water in any way while stepping across it would not get married that year.

http://www.glasgowhistory.co.uk/ShettlestonSketch.htm

The 'Arms' Well or is it 'Ams' or even 'Arns' :?
Of these wells, those still in existence, though now closed, are the famous Arns Well, [Named from the "am" or alder trees which grew about it near the Humane Society House on Glasgow Green

http://www.electricscotland.com/history ... ow3_45.htm
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby cheesemonster » Thu Feb 05, 2009 3:15 pm

Sharon wrote:After HGs visit to the polish club (apparently theres another polish club at st georges x) my taxi driver on the way home told me a wee story about a white witch wanting to sell healing water from the Lady Well - although according to wikipedia it is capped so that could be a tricky endeavour!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Well

His version of this story had more detail... unfortunately alcohol provides a buffer between the detail and the recall! :?

You mean you got into a taxi at a Polish club and instead of getting a chat about Poles stealing our jobs you got a chat about witches and wells? Well done you! :P
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:03 pm

From Hugh MacDonald’s ‘Rambles Around Glasgow’:

Glasgow Green:
Passing Arn’s Well, which is famed for the quality of its water, and which received its name from a group of alder (Seduce, "arn") trees, which formerly graced the spot, we arrive at the Humane Society House.


Other (non holy) wells from the same source ('scuse the pun)

Ladle Well, Fleshers’ Haugh:
Great alterations have been effected on the Fleshers’ Haugh within the memory of persons still living. We remember, in our own boyish days, a fine spring, called the "Ladle Well," on the northern declivity, with a considerable ditch or marsh in its vicinity. The well and marsh, however, have long disappeared, the water of both being now conveyed away by a covered drain, while the grass waves green on terra firma where the lasses of Brigtown came to fill their cans, and adventurous urchins, miscalculating their leaping powers—as we from sad experience can testify— were often plunged to the waist in mud.


Robin's Well, Glasgow Green:
But to return to the Green itself. At the foot of the bank on which we are standing, and within a few yards of each other, are two fine cool crystalline springs, which, although so near each other, possess very opposite qualities. The one, locally denominated "Robin’s Well," is famous for bleaching purposes and for the dilution of "gude Scots’ drink;" while the other, being moderately impregnated with a solution of ferruginous matter, is strictly avoided alike by the washerwoman and the connoisseur of punch.


Pear-tree Well, Botanic Gardens:
At the western extremity of the Botanic Gardens a narrow passage, in popular parlance called the "Kyber Pass," leads over a green knoll to the valley of the Kelvin at the famous "Pear-tree Well."
The Pear-tree Well issues from the bottom of a steep and thickly wooded bank, which, at this point, rises gracefully, from the rocky bed of the streamlet. The crystalline and deliciously cool water is collected into a considerable cavity in the earth; immediately over which three large trees, a plane and two handsome ashes, raise on high their umbrageous beads, while their sturdy roots, in serpentlike convolutions, twine around the watery hollow beneath, as if to defend it from the intrusion of the penetrating noonday sun. Some suppose that it is from this trio of sylvan guardians that the fountain has received its name—and that the "Three-tree," and not the "Pear-tree," Well is its proper denomination. The advocates of the latter theory further remark, that there is no pear-tree in the vicinity, and that consequently the popular name is probably but a corruption of "Three-tree." There is high authority for saying that names are things of slight consequence; but however that may be, we are inclined, in the present instance, to be conservative of the old name for this favourite well, and to retain it in spite of all attempts at innovation. Whether from langsyne associations or not, we shall not attempt to discover, but Pear-tree Well sounds most musically on our ear—and we should be loath to have it suppressed by the word-coinage of any crotchety theorist; and besides, who can tell what kind of trees may have formerly graced the locality? A perfect orchard of the pear tribe may, at some past period, have clothed the banks of Kelvin, for anything that these violators of a time-honoured name—"these men who are given to change"—know to the contrary. No, no! Pear-tree Well it has been, and Pear-tree Well to us, at least, it must remain. We had as lief meet an old friend with a new face as an old haunt with a new name.

NB: The Pear-Tree Well was just beside the present Kirklee Bridge Gate of the botanic Gardens. It exists no longer, but its waters (diverted from their original channel) may be seen entering the river higher up.


The Borgie Well, Cambuslang:
There are several fine springs in the glen, at which groups of girls from the village, with their water pitchers, are generally congregated, lending an additional charm to the landscape, which is altogether of the most picturesque nature. One of these springs, called "the Borgie well," is famous for the quality of its water, which, it is jocularly said, has a deteriorating influence on the wits of those who habitually use it. Those who drink of the "Borgie," we were informed by a gash old fellow who once helped us to a draught of it, are sure to turn "half.daft," and will never leave Cambuslang if they can help it. However this may be, we can assure such of our readers as may venture to taste it that they will find a bicker of it a treat of no ordinary kind, more especially if they have threaded the mazes of the glen, as we have been doing, under the vertical radiance of a July sun.

“A drink o’ the Borgie, a taste o’ the weed,
Sets a’ the Cams’lang folks wrang in the heid”
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby EdBoyle » Mon Mar 16, 2009 3:56 pm

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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Mon Mar 16, 2009 5:49 pm

Cheers, EB. :wink:
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Tue Apr 14, 2009 5:57 pm

Southern Necropolis:
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Wed Jan 27, 2010 9:44 pm

Arn's Well on Glasgow Green:
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PUBLIC WELLS IN THE CITY.
The following is a list of the Public Wells in the City, specifying the Depth of the Pits, the Height of Water, &c. as taken in February 1816.

No. 1. Argt/le-Street—This Well is near Union-Place; it is thirteen feet deep; the water stands three feet, leaving ten feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 2. Argyle-Street This Well is a little west from St. Enoch's
Wynd; is nine feet deep; the water stands two feet four inches, leaving six feet eight inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 3. Argyle-Strcet.—This Well is near Turner's Court; it is thirteen feet six inches deep; the water stands four feet ten inches, leaving a space of eight feet eight inches between the causeway and the surface of the water.

No. 4. ArgyU-Street This Well is known by the name of the
West Port; it is twenty-three feet six inches deep; th,e water stands six feet, leaving seventeen feet six inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 5. Albion-Street, South This Well is near the Gate of the
Police-Office; it is thirty feet deep; the water stands twenty-two feet; leaving eight feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 6. Bridgegate-Slreei This Well is near the east end of the
Goose-Dubs; it is sixteen feet eleven inches deep; the water stands five feet one inch, leaving eleven feet ten inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 7. Buchanan-Street This Well adjoins Argyle-Street; it is
fourteen feet one inch deep; the water stands two feet eleven inches, leaving eleven feet two inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 8. Campbell-Street This Well is near the Gallowgate; it is
twenty-six feet deep; the water stands twelve feet, leaving fourteen feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 9. Canon-Street.—This Well is at the Gate of the NorthWest Burying-Ground; it is thirty feet deep; the water stands eleven feet, leaving nineteen feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 10. Castle-Street This Well is near the Howgate; it is
forty-two feet deep, and stands brimful of water.

No. 11. Claythorn-Street.—This Well is near the Gallowgate; it is nine feet deep, and stands brimful of water.

No. 12. Cochran-Street.—This Well is at the north end of JohnStreet Relief Meeting-House; it is eighteen feet eleven inches deep; the water stands six feet seven inches, leaving twelve feet four inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 13. Duke-Street.—This well is opposite to Bridewell; it is sixteen feet deep; the water stands ten feet, leaving six feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 14. George's Street—This Well is near the Grammar-School; it is eleven feet deep; the water stands seven feet eight inches, leaving three feet four inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 15. George's Street.—This Well is known by the name of the Deanside; it is thirty-five feet deep; the water stands twentyfour feet, leaving eleven feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 16. George's Street—This Well is near the High-Street; it is eleven feet deep, and stands brimful of water.

No. 17. High-Street—This Well is at the bottom of the Old Vennal, and is known by the name of the Cross Well; it is twentynine feet deep; the water stands eight feet, leaving twenty-one feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 18. King-Street—This Well adjoins the Beef Market; it is twelve feet one inch deep; the water stands five feet three inches, leaving six feet ten inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 19. Kirk-Street—This Well is near the Trades* Alms House; the pit being shut up in the Bowling-Green, the depth is not ascertained.

No. 20. Lady-Well Street This Well is known by the name of
the Lady-Well; it is five feet deep; the water stands one foot eleven inches, leaving three feet one inch from the causeway to the surfac.e of the water.

No 21. Montrose-Street.—This Well is opposite to the GuardHouse; it is sixteen feet deep; the water stands six feet, leaving ten feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 22. Saltmarlet-Street.—This Well is near the bottom of the Street, below the Bridgegate-Street; it is twelve feet deep; the water stands four feet, leaving eight feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 23. St. Enoch's Wynd.—This Well is at the south end of the Wynd, near Howard-Street; it is nine feet deep, the water stands six feet, leaving three feet from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 24. Spout mouth This Well is near the Gallowgate; it is
eighteen feet ten inches deep; the water stands three feet two inches, leaving fifteen feet eight inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 25. StockweU-Slreet.—This Well is about the middle of the Street; it is nine feet six inches deep; the water stands three feet three inches, leaving between the causeway and the water, six feet three inches.

No. 26. St Andrew's Lane.—This Well is near the Gallowgate; it is twelve feet deep; the water stands three feet eleven inches, leaving eight feet one inch from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 27. St Andrew's Street—This Well is near the SaltmarketStreet; it is twenty-two feet ten inches deep; the water stands five feet two inches, leaving seventeen feet eight inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 28. 7'rongate This well is near the Back Wynd; it is
twenty-four feet deep; the water stands seven feet one inch, leaving sixteen feet eleven inches from the causeway to the surface of the water.

No. 29. Trongate.—This Well is a little West from the Exchange, and is nearly dry; the pit is shut up in a cellar in the adjoining close. A pipe from the Glasgow Water-Works Company is introduced into the frame of this Well.

No. 30. Wilson-Street This Well is near Hutcheson-Street; it
is twenty-five feet deep; the water stands seven feet eight inches, leaving a space of seventeen feet four inches between the causeway and the water.



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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby crusty_bint » Fri Sep 02, 2011 11:16 pm

following on from HH's information about St Mungo's Well at Little Dove Hill, here are some maps...

this late 19th c watercolour shows the rear of the Saracen's Head, the well being contained in the single storey lean to
Image
from scran

1857, red ring indicates the location of the well
Image
from maps.nls

1893, same again
Image
from maps.nls

the Saracen's Head was demolished in 1905 and the well restored in 1906 and so doesn't appear until the 1911 map. the adjoining lands are rebuilt in the same period.

1911, smaller red ring indicates the location of the well, this is the well's first appearance on the OS maps
Image
from old maps

1952, smaller red ring indicates the location of the well, this is the well's last appearance on the OS maps
Image
from old maps

note the fountain indicated on the last two maps, overlaid with a larger red ring. the fountain is partially shown in the following pic, accompanied by the following text:

187-205 Gallowgate, 8 Jan. 1967: Mission Hall at rear (TL Watson, 1905-1906, demolished)
Image
from virtual mitchell

going a little off topic, i know, but anyone have any theories? was it designed and built new with the mission hall? was it salvaged from another building/garden?
here i go, it's coming for me through the trees
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby RDR » Sat Sep 03, 2011 9:50 am

There's a Ladywell in Motherwell. I wonder if it falls under the holy wells group?
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Re: The Holy Wells in & around Glasgow

Postby HollowHorn » Sat Sep 03, 2011 7:17 pm

crusty_bint wrote:going a little off topic, i know, but anyone have any theories? was it designed and built new with the mission hall? was it salvaged from another building/garden?


The Saracen Head Tenement, which replaced the historic Saracen Head Inn, was originally provided with a splendid, cast iron fountain in its back court designed and manufactured by Walter Macfarlane 's Saracen Foundry, which had occupied the site from 1850-62, before it relocated to Possilpark. The fountain, after years of neglect and ruin, and despite calls for its restoration as a potential tourist attraction, was destroyed in the 1950s (another historic landmark at the rear of the tenement was the ancient St Mungo's Well).
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