Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby mrsam » Mon Jun 27, 2011 6:42 pm

cell wrote:Thanks Joseph, I'm glad folks find these of interest and as always I'd really like to see any other manufactures plates that people have or know about, strictly speaking they should be from Glasgow or in Glasgow, but I'm also interested in any Scottish manufacturing concern.


mrsam wrote:Found in dunblane on a flying visit to the high st

Image

Mr Sam


Mr S, I'm guessing your photo was of a hook on a pull down shop awning, I had a quick search for the company and came up with a letterhead in the excellent Robert Pool's collection, although the office address is different, Renfield St instead of West Regent St, the product type is very similar so I guess it was the same company.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/robertpool/4351182858/


As a pure coincident the same search threw up the Whiting Society Bell list for the Gorbals Bell Foundry (this was mentioned recently on another thread) which shows that John Bryden was supplied a number of bells from 1840 onwards. The letterhead has a bell logo and indicates that they supplied bell hangers so were obviously bell contractors who supplied and fitted your bell, there can't be many of them left today!


Thanks Cell, that's intersting to know

Yes it was a pulldown shop awning thing.

Mr Sam
Hmmm I wonder what happens if i press that lever.... Ahh It operates that shiny new plug socket!

www..photobucket.com/albums/ll103/thecuriocollector

www..photobucket.com/albums/v195/tarbat2003
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby cell » Wed Jul 06, 2011 6:43 pm

W&S Pollock, engine builders and iron founders founded in 1878.
Image
Robertson St of the Broomelaw seems a bit central for this type of business, perhaps there is another Robertson St?
I don’t know much about this company expect what it says on the plate, I did find a legal case which confirms they were making marine engines (dodgy ones by the sound of it) in 1917.
http://www.britishcaselaw.co.uk/wands-p ... -july-1922
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby Guacho » Wed Jul 06, 2011 8:52 pm

Looks like this was their main office rather than the stank factory- post office directory 1911/12
http://www.archive.org/stream/postoffic ... 4/mode/2up
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby cell » Sun Aug 07, 2011 11:39 am

Always nice to do one of these for a company that is still going strong and is world leader with a number of important firsts in its history. Howden’s are best known for their fans and were key in the development of using forced draughts to improve the efficiency of coal fired boilers in ships and power stations.

Image

The Ljungstrom plate is from a preheater used in conjunction with a boiler

The history below is lifted straight from their web site, interestingly they don’t mention the Channel Tunnel boring machines that they built in their Scotland St factory nor the full scale wind turbines that they experimented with long before they were fashionable. They must also have been the first in the flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) business for power stations, I didn’t think anyone worried about that in the 1930s!

The original Howden Factory was opened in 1862 on Scotland St, in 1898 a new, larger one designed by Nisbet Sinclair at 195 Scotland Street, down the road from his original factory was opened. This had central-heating which was considered a rarity at the time. With increasing orders, the factory was enlarged, first in 1904, and then again in 1912, to a design by Bryden & Robertson. In 1981 a special purpose factory was opened in Renfrew to manufacture CO2 circulators for the AGR programme in the UK. The Scotland St factory is now closed and currently their design engineering, project management, proposals and aftermarket support are carried out at Renfrew & Craigton. Their manufacturing facility is in Belfast , where centrifugal fans, axial fans and heat exchanger manufacture is undertaken and their Construction and Maintenance Division's headquarters are in the West Midlands of England.

Here is a couple of past and presents for the Scotland Street Factory, the big sheds past Scotland St School have gone but the majority of the frontage is still there. Pasts are John Hume photos from the RCAHMS site. http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/en/site/16 ... n+s+works/
Image
Image
Image
Image

Quick quiz for any of you old car experts to identify the models in the past photos

Howden UK History
Howden UK's origins are the fan and heat exchanger businesses of two companies founded by innovative engineers in the 19th century - James Howden and Samuel Davidson.
1854 James Howden sets up business working as a consulting engineer in Glasgow.
1857 James Howden commences the design and supply of boilers and steam engines for the marine propulsion industry.
1860 James Howden patents a method of preheating combustion air for marine boilers.
1863 James Howden introduces a furnace mechanical draught system which uses a steam turbine driven axial flow fan.
1875 Samuel Davidson patents tea drying machinery.
1881 Samuel Davidson sets up business at Bridge End in Belfast.
1882 James Howden patents the 'Howden System of Forced Draught' which combines mechanical draught with the transfer of heat from the flue gases to the combustion air.
1898 Samuel Davidson invents the forward bladed centrifugal fan - the 'Sirocco®' fan.
1898 Davidson and Company formed as a limited company.
1918 Howden opens a factory in Wellsville, NY, to manufacture forced draught equipment.
1923 Negotiations with A/B Ljungströms Angeturbin (ALA) result in the formation of a joint venture company – Howden Ljungström Preheaters (Land) Limited based in Glasgow and Wellsville to develop and manufacture the rotary air preheater.
1926 The Davidson mechanical dust collector is patented.
1931 Davidson & Company supplies its 100,000th fan.
1931 Holdings in the Howden-Ljungstrom joint ventures are exchanged and James Howden & Company and the Ljungstrom Company take full control of the UK and the US organisations respectively.
1934 In conjunction with ICI, Howden develops a flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) system for use in power stations. This is installed at 3 power stations in the UK.
1947 Howden supplies the main blowers for the world's first two large nuclear reactors at Windscale, UK.
1957 Lurgi licences Howden to manufacture its range of electrostatic precipitators in the UK.
1962 Howden receives an order for the first air preheater with adjustable sector plates.
1966 Howden incorporates sensors to control sector plates in its range of air preheaters.
1966 James Howden & Co receives the order for the world's first submerged gas circulators for the UK Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) programme.
1979 The first air preheater is retrofitted with the Howden advanced VN sealing system.
1981 A special purpose factory is opened in Renfrew to manufacture CO2 circulators for the AGR programme in the UK.
1982 Howden re-enters the FGD industry by supplying the second gas-gas heater to be installed in Europe, at Nijmegen Power Station in The Netherlands.
1988 Howden acquires Davidson Group. Howden Sirocco Limited is formed, combining the air and gas handling activities of James Howden & Co and Davidson and Co.
2001 The Company becomes part of the Power Division of Howden Group and is renamed Howden Power Limited. It becomes the Howden global Centre of Excellence for centrifugal fans and rotary heat exchangers.
2006 The Company is renamed Howden UK.
http://www.howden.com/en/Businesses/HowdenUK/
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby The Egg Man » Sun Aug 07, 2011 4:38 pm

Excellent post. Well done cell.
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby Vinegar Tom » Sun Aug 07, 2011 9:02 pm

Thanks for taking the time to post that Cell. Great post.
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby frankquinn24 » Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:55 pm

Image

does a ships platee count? from ferry No8 @ Kelvin Harbour. (normally dismounted unless in operation,to prevent it getting "pinched") Ps not my photo.although I am associated with the ferry
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby cell » Thu Aug 25, 2011 6:02 pm

nice one!
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby frankquinn24 » Mon Sep 05, 2011 8:38 pm

Image
plates by frankquinn24, on Flickr
not exactly manufacturer's plates but small replicas. I take it the diamond shaped NB Loco plates were used for Polmadie works round plates for Springburn I don't know if the numbers used were for real engines.
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby moonbeam » Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:01 am

Re NB Loco plates. The diamond is indeed for the Polmadie works. These were originally Dubs & Co.
When Henry Dubs excavated the ground to build the works in April 1864 good clay to make bricks was
found. Dubs put a diamond mark on the bricks which was adopted as the "Diamond" nameplate
he used as a trademark. This was subsequently adopted by the NB loco company as a nameplate.
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby the researcher » Tue Sep 06, 2011 11:58 am

cell wrote:Always nice to do one of these for a company that is still going strong and is world leader with a number of important firsts in its history. Howden’s are best known for their fans and were key in the development of using forced draughts to improve the efficiency of coal fired boilers in ships and power stations.

Image

The Ljungstrom plate is from a preheater used in conjunction with a boiler

The history below is lifted straight from their web site, interestingly they don’t mention the Channel Tunnel boring machines that they built in their Scotland St factory nor the full scale wind turbines that they experimented with long before they were fashionable. They must also have been the first in the flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) business for power stations, I didn’t think anyone worried about that in the 1930s!

The original Howden Factory was opened in 1862 on Scotland St, in 1898 a new, larger one designed by Nisbet Sinclair at 195 Scotland Street, down the road from his original factory was opened. This had central-heating which was considered a rarity at the time. With increasing orders, the factory was enlarged, first in 1904, and then again in 1912, to a design by Bryden & Robertson. In 1981 a special purpose factory was opened in Renfrew to manufacture CO2 circulators for the AGR programme in the UK. The Scotland St factory is now closed and currently their design engineering, project management, proposals and aftermarket support are carried out at Renfrew & Craigton. Their manufacturing facility is in Belfast , where centrifugal fans, axial fans and heat exchanger manufacture is undertaken and their Construction and Maintenance Division's headquarters are in the West Midlands of England.

Here is a couple of past and presents for the Scotland Street Factory, the big sheds past Scotland St School have gone but the majority of the frontage is still there. Pasts are John Hume photos from the RCAHMS site. http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/en/site/16 ... n+s+works/
Image
Image
Image
Image

Quick quiz for any of you old car experts to identify the models in the past photos

Howden UK History
Howden UK's origins are the fan and heat exchanger businesses of two companies founded by innovative engineers in the 19th century - James Howden and Samuel Davidson.
1854 James Howden sets up business working as a consulting engineer in Glasgow.
1857 James Howden commences the design and supply of boilers and steam engines for the marine propulsion industry.
1860 James Howden patents a method of preheating combustion air for marine boilers.
1863 James Howden introduces a furnace mechanical draught system which uses a steam turbine driven axial flow fan.
1875 Samuel Davidson patents tea drying machinery.
1881 Samuel Davidson sets up business at Bridge End in Belfast.
1882 James Howden patents the 'Howden System of Forced Draught' which combines mechanical draught with the transfer of heat from the flue gases to the combustion air.
1898 Samuel Davidson invents the forward bladed centrifugal fan - the 'Sirocco®' fan.
1898 Davidson and Company formed as a limited company.
1918 Howden opens a factory in Wellsville, NY, to manufacture forced draught equipment.
1923 Negotiations with A/B Ljungströms Angeturbin (ALA) result in the formation of a joint venture company – Howden Ljungström Preheaters (Land) Limited based in Glasgow and Wellsville to develop and manufacture the rotary air preheater.
1926 The Davidson mechanical dust collector is patented.
1931 Davidson & Company supplies its 100,000th fan.
1931 Holdings in the Howden-Ljungstrom joint ventures are exchanged and James Howden & Company and the Ljungstrom Company take full control of the UK and the US organisations respectively.
1934 In conjunction with ICI, Howden develops a flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) system for use in power stations. This is installed at 3 power stations in the UK.
1947 Howden supplies the main blowers for the world's first two large nuclear reactors at Windscale, UK.
1957 Lurgi licences Howden to manufacture its range of electrostatic precipitators in the UK.
1962 Howden receives an order for the first air preheater with adjustable sector plates.
1966 Howden incorporates sensors to control sector plates in its range of air preheaters.
1966 James Howden & Co receives the order for the world's first submerged gas circulators for the UK Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) programme.
1979 The first air preheater is retrofitted with the Howden advanced VN sealing system.
1981 A special purpose factory is opened in Renfrew to manufacture CO2 circulators for the AGR programme in the UK.
1982 Howden re-enters the FGD industry by supplying the second gas-gas heater to be installed in Europe, at Nijmegen Power Station in The Netherlands.
1988 Howden acquires Davidson Group. Howden Sirocco Limited is formed, combining the air and gas handling activities of James Howden & Co and Davidson and Co.
2001 The Company becomes part of the Power Division of Howden Group and is renamed Howden Power Limited. It becomes the Howden global Centre of Excellence for centrifugal fans and rotary heat exchangers.
2006 The Company is renamed Howden UK.
http://www.howden.com/en/Businesses/HowdenUK/

a cousin of my grandads worked at howdens as a draughtman his name was bobby cameron he lost his left leg in a motorbike accident when he was 17 and had a tin leg like douglas bader he used to drive a vauxhall estate car which was automatic despite having a false leg this didnt prevent him from jacking up his car and dropping the gearbox to change the clutch plate
i think he lived on the outskirts of glasgow but cant remember where i think he moved to the isle of tiree when he retired
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby The Egg Man » Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:13 pm

Slightly off topic. It looks like someone trying to buy the firm which owns Howden.


Colfax, the listed US pump specialist, has emerged as the mystery bidder for Charter International, the owner of Scottish engineering stalwart Howden, setting the stage for a potential bid battle.


http://www.heraldscotland.com/business/ ... -1.1121908
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby frankquinn24 » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:34 pm

Image
DCP_0176 by frankquinn24, on Flickr
Plate on a Steam Hammer used as a "sculpture" in Kirkie access to canal path @ Townhead Bridge I assume we can take Kirkintilloch as a Legit. location for the site
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby cell » Sun Sep 11, 2011 4:11 pm

Nice one Frank, never seen a brass one from P&W Maclellan, they seem to be getting plenty of coverage on this thread.

I like your Loco plates, I’ve got a couple of these, but generally they are out of my price range! The coat of arms is an old aluminium casting I believe came from a road sign? which I painted up. Excuse the vivid green shelf, it was a bad colour choice!

Image
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Re: Manufacturer's plates and stanks seen in Glasgow

Postby cell » Sun Dec 18, 2011 4:33 pm

Mavor & Coulson, were a well known manufacturer of electricity generators and other gear and were the provider of Glasgow's first public electricity supply. The Glasgow supply system was subsequently acquired by Glasgow Corporation.

In later years, Mavor specialised in the application of electric power to the mining industry. Machines developed and manufactured by Mavor & Coulson for coal cutting and conveying greatly increased productivity in the West of Scotland coalfields and were sold across the world. The first plate is from a 1937 “Samson” coal loader which would have been used underground.

Anderson Boyes merged with Mavor & Coulson in 1966 under the name of Anderson Mavor Ltd and in 1974 changed its name to Anderson Strathclyde Ltd. The principal products became the power loader and, to a lesser extent, the roadheader. The merged company continued to play a major role in the mechanisation of coal winning by the NCB, particularly over the 1960s, and Anderson Strathclyde's further development and growth were partly based on the important contribution it made at that time. Laterly the main works were relocated to Motherwell outside Ravenscraig and the company name changed to Anderson Longwall, I believe they are are no longer in existance no doubt it demise went hand in hand with the decline in the British coal industry.

Image
Image

Here is a past and present for Broad St, Mile End factory, not much has changed with the majority of the frontage is still there. Past is a John Hume photo from the RCAHMS site.

Image
Image

This was the first part of Mavor and Coulson's works to be purpose-built. It was designed by Andrew Myles, and subsequently extended to the rear. This was probably the first purpose-built electrical engineering works in Glasgow, internally it had a large full-height erecting bay flanked by galleries for lighter work. The central arched opening was originally a doorway and has now been reopened, the site is now used by the motor factors Andrew Watt.

This a great set of pictures showing some 1930s advertising for the company’s products.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/36844288@N ... otostream/
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