St Andrew's Square

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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby HollowHorn » Tue Oct 09, 2007 10:11 pm

Well spotted, Elgee. If Nina's photo is of No.23 (Picture Framer) then it's location has certainly moved with the new build. I do believe however that we are indeed looking at the south eastern corner of the square rather than at the north eastern, so who knows!
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Wed Oct 10, 2007 6:33 am

I am gobsmacked with you lot! I cannot believe the amount of information that has been found about St Andrew's Square! Everyoner has contributed so much! But Hollowhorn, you have really come up trumps! I have cut and pasted your entire postings because they really tell the story...so a big THANK you once again! and yes, what an incredibly busy place!

As to the photo I posted (no date, sorry)...I have no clue what number the picture framers is at. It was the only photo I had of the Square, and that is why I posted it. I never thought it could possibly be number 23, but I had always thought it was at the top left side of the square at the end opposite to St Andrew's Road. I could be wrong, as I am hopeless at directions.

I find it interesting that the place seems to be surrounded with many church institutions of one kind or another. It seems like a really strange place for a houseful of Catholics to decide to live, given the 'climate' of the day. Merlot, I think the "John King" at No. 23 mentioned on the Valuation roll may be a son in law of my Logans, but given the common name it is hard to prove without documentation. I may just have to see if they had any kids born there....that would bring my family connection back to 1913-14 or even to 1909, when this John King married Mary Logan.

Anyway, thanks once again!

Nina
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Wed Oct 10, 2007 7:42 am

I found a little more info on the picture mentioned above. It was from Virtual Mitchell who list it as number 15 St Andrew's Square, J & R Browning, Picture Frame Makers. This is also the name listed for number 23 St Andrew's Square in the 1913-14 Valuation Roll. So either they moved at some point, or the numbering system changed. If that was number 15, then wouldn't number 23 be in the corner? Interestingly I do have a reference for one of my McCormack family living at number 16 St Andrew's Square in 1919 when she married. Strangely she died four months later in number 23, but then the family could have been caring for her when she was ill. Hmmm....

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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Wed Oct 10, 2007 7:52 am

I think I found your stained glass Hollowhorn (from VM), but it had no date. Seen from inside the church, and not a great photo:

Image

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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby HollowHorn » Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:36 am

I was heading up to the Mitchell Library yesterday for some in depth research when I was waylaid by a thirsty HG'er who took me on a pub crawl instead. See me? See willpower? :oops:

I think you are right about you're photo being at top left of the square, the sign does indeed say 'Picture Frame Makers' (well done you) I'll check out the present location of No.15 next time I'm up. Looking at the maps, there is also a 'pend' on that side, so that would fit in too. Don't know about No.23 being in the corner though, are there enough doorways for that?
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:56 am

You are right hollowhorn, I miscounted I think. But even so it could be (counting by odd numbers) that from number 15, number 23 would be just to the right of that corner.

I wouldn't mind a bit of a drink myself tonight (rough day - a good way to end it :) ) but I still have to work tomorrow and since I work with kids I had better be good. Next time you are on the way to the Library, maybe a pair of blinkers would be in order? :D :wink: :P

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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby Fossil » Thu Oct 11, 2007 5:28 pm

ninatoo wrote:You are right hollowhorn, I miscounted I think. But even so it could be (counting by odd numbers) that from number 15, number 23 would be just to the right of that corner.

I wouldn't mind a bit of a drink myself tonight (rough day - a good way to end it :) ) but I still have to work tomorrow and since I work with kids I had better be good. Next time you are on the way to the Library, maybe a pair of blinkers would be in order? :D :wink: :P

Nina


blame me Nina :oops:
Bum tit tit bum tit tit play yer hairy banjo
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Thu Oct 11, 2007 8:52 pm

Oh it's no bother fossil. I could harldly complain after all the information already supplied, could I....seems to me you had all earned a drink! :wink:

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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby HollowHorn » Thu Oct 11, 2007 9:45 pm

It would have been so much better had he put his hand in his pocket, but the boxing gloves would'nt allow that ::):

Anyway, photos of the Church paving stones, or as us old timers know them: 'Plain Stanes' :wink:
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& the two plaques:
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Last few times we've been to Cafe Source there has been a wedding in the church above, stunning venue, all the lads in kilts & the lassies in silk & taffeta, beautiful.
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby HollowHorn » Thu Oct 11, 2007 10:53 pm

2pm on 23rd November 1785, Vincenzo Lunardie ascends into the heavens from the rear of St. Andrews in the Square:

The Grand Air Balloon, which was made of 1500 feet of green, pink and yellow silk, was exhibited, "supended in its floating state" in the choir of Glasgow's cathedral for the admission charge of one shilling. On the 23rd November 1785, an immense crowd gathered in St Andrew's Square to witness the flight. The weather was fine and at around 2pm, Lunardi "ascended into the atmosphere with majestic grandeur, to the astonishment and admiration of the spectators" the flight path was not entirely visible because of cloud, but the balloon was seen passing over Hamilton and Lanark before finally making a good landing near Hawick in the Borders, where he landed at the feet of "trembling shepherds", the journey of 110 miles had taken 2 hours.

Lunardi's second ascent a few weeks later started off with a near calamity, when a character, known as Lothian Tam, in his eagerness to get a close view of the flight became entangled in the balloon's ropes and was lifted 20 feet into the air until he was released and fell to the ground with no serious injury. The weather on this trip was much more blustery and Lunardi made a hard landing, after 20 minutes, in Campsie Glen around 12 miles from Glasgow.

Vinny Lunardi was at his best playing to the crowd that always came to see him ascend. This is a painting of the balloon he created "in tribute to everything British".


The poles in the background held the balloon as it was inflated.
http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/AC/aircraf ... o/info.htm

Image

A writer in the Glasgow Advertiser thus describes the sensation caused by Lunardi's first ascent from that city:
'Many were amazingly affected. Some shed tears, and some fainted, while others insisted that he was in compact with the devil, and ought to be looked upon as a man reprobated by the Almighty.'
http://www.thebookofdays.com/months/sept/15.htm


Lunardi had previously ascended in his balloon
from St. Andrew's Square, then not built upon, but only a vacant
space of ground. This, however, had been found an inconvenient
place, as the public could view the process of inflating the balloon
from several quarters, which of course lessened the profits of the
aeronaut. The ascent from St Andrew's Square was most magnificent.
The balloon passed over the heads of the thousands
assembled in the Green of Glasgow, and was seen majestically
gliding along, in the full view of the wondering multitude, until
it seemed dissolved in the thin air of the distant atmosphere.
Lunardi descended in the vicinity of Hawick, a distance of 70
miles, and was upwards of two hours in performing his aerial
voyage. An accident had nearly happened in St. Andrew's
Square on this occasion; for the Rev. Mr. Lothian, teacher of
mathematics, being anxious to see the effect of inflating the
balloon from the gas generated by the admixture of oil of vitriol
and iron filings, incautiously got himself entangled among the
ropes which held down the balloon at the very moment of its
ascent. The consequence was that the rev. gentleman was thrown
down and dragged along by the foot for some distance ; and had
not the ropes uncoiled of themselves, he might have been carried
up with the balloon, suspended by the leg. As the rev. mathematician,
however, had received no hurt by the accident, his ludicrous
situation became a source of much merriment in the city. The
subsequent ascent from the garden of the Merchants' House was
not so successful as the one from St. Andrew's Square—the
balloon descending at the shorter distance of Campsie It passed
over the city, but was not so distinctly seen in its progress as it
was on the first occasion.
I was present in the Green of Glasgow viewing both ascents.
I was then in the Grammar School, and we got the play, as our
teachers said, in order that we might behold the wonderful
spectacle; but boys are sharp enough, and they, with a good
deal of jeering, alleged that the play was given, not on their
account, but merely because the teachers themselves were anxious
to see the exhibition.

http://books.google.com/books?id=tW8CAA ... 2hATNbuoJo

I've read somewhere that the crowd gathered for Lunardie's St. Andrews flight was one of the largest that Glasgow has ever seen.

A little glimpse of the Square:
ST. ANDREW'S SQUARE dates from 1787, and in its early years was an aristocratic quarter. Later, only the wealthiest merchants could afford to reside in it. In my youthful days its mansions were surrounded by gardens, in which grew various kinds of fruit trees. St. Andrew's Parish Church was begun in 1739, but not finished till 1756. Standing in the centre of the square, with its lofty spire and clock, it has quite an imposing look, and adds dignity to the neighbourhood. The interior of this handsome ecclesiastical building is beautiful. On its western front there is a grand Portico with a flat arch, which has excited the wonder of antiquarians. The architect was Mungo Naismyth, grandfather of the founder of the Young Men's Christian Association. The Rev. Dr. Candlish, before he was settled in St. George's, Edinburgh, aspired to be its minister. But changed is the square: gone is its high estate. The stately buildings, erstwhile the abode of the honoured and wealthy of the city, *are now tenanted by humble toilers*, or turned into places of business. But though the square is not so celebrated as in days of yore, yet from its proximity to two of our most beneficent philanthropic and religious agencies, it is well-known to visitors.
Glimpses of Old Glasgow

*= Hahaha, from humble beginings, eh Lexi? ::):

A wonderful photograph from Carol Foreman in her marvelous book 'Glasgow From the Air' It really puts the modern square into perspective:
Image

Carol Foreman's books on Glasgow really are superb, every home should have one :wink:
Carol's books
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby Josef » Fri Oct 12, 2007 6:33 am

Great work, HH. Impressive stuff :)
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby crusty_bint » Fri Oct 12, 2007 2:31 pm

Fantastic thread, excellent work HH!!
here i go, it's coming for me through the trees
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby ninatoo » Sat Oct 13, 2007 5:34 am

Yes, an amazing amount of information! Thanks again, HH.

Nina
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby Doorstop » Sat Oct 13, 2007 6:09 am

Another fully informative wee thread HH, sterling work. I never tire of learning more about a City I thought I knew everything about.

Wee point though .. what's this? Image It's in the bottom left of the aerial image.
I like him ... He says "Okie Dokie!"
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Re: St Andrew's Square

Postby HollowHorn » Sat Oct 13, 2007 6:47 am

It's a children's playground on Glasgow Green.
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