The Clyde ferries

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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Dugald » Mon Mar 10, 2008 9:22 pm

HH, I know that the first two pictures are related to the Govan "horse-ferry". The first one shows one land-derrick (on the quay). There were of course two of these derricks and this is shown on the second picture. The derricks, as was mentioned on an earlier post, were used to raise and lower the vehicle-deck in accordance with the Clyde's tidal-height variations. I must mention that the palings (fencing), visible on both the first two pictures are as much a symbol of Glasgow as the city's coat-of-arms! I'd guess Glasgow Corporation have been using this kind of fencing for well over a century!

I'm not sure what the third picture is HH. Is looks of xourse like the remnants of a dock, a quay, but I can't recall a quay being here. There was of course the old Govan landing dock but that wasn't as close to the Govan Ferry docking bay, as it appears here. The Govan dock was about midway between the Govan Ferry and the Whiteinch Ferry.

Intersting pictures
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Mori » Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:28 pm

As far as i am aware the Water row ferry stance is to be excavated and reconsiderd for a ferry terminal, i also heard that the terminal which is buried under the river bank has a listing status.


Quote:
Proposed Pointhouse to Govan Pedestrian Ferry Service—Feasibility study agreed.
19 There was submitted a report by the Executive Director, Land and Environmental Services seeking
approval to carry out a feasibility study into the provision of a pedestrian ferry service between the proposed
New Riverside Museum at Pointhouse on the north bank of the River Clyde and Govan on the south bank,
advising
(1) that the Council was currently developing a project for the relocation of the existing Transport Museum
to a new facility on the north bank of the Clyde at Pointhouse at the confluence of the Rivers Clyde and
Kelvin;
(2) that as part of the relocation project, consideration was being given to access existing public transport
hubs in the immediate area of the museum site and into the ease of walking from these hubs;
(3) that at present there were no river crossings for pedestrians between the Millennium Bridge, some 1.1km
upstream of Pointhouse and 1.6km downstream from the Clyde Tunnel;
(4) that the provision of a pedestrian ferry linking Water Row at Govan to Pointhouse would remove those
restrictions and provide an attractive route both in terms of accessibility and visitor experience to the
relocated Transport Museum;
(5) that in order to take this work forward, it was proposed to have a multi disciplinary team investigate the
various aspects of the provision of a ferry service to investigate both land based requirements and the
type of ferry vessel to be used; and
(6) of the anticipated cost of the feasibility study, which would be in the region of £25,000.
After consideration, the Council agreed to procure a feasibility study into the provision of a pedestrian ferry
service across the River Clyde between Pointhouse and Govan including the identification of a suitable craft
and environmentally friendly propulsion system.

Another doc i had in my files regarding the govan ferry study.


BACKGROUND
Glasgow City Council is currently developing a project for the relocation of the existing Transport
Museum to a new facility on the north bank of the Clyde at Pointhouse at the confluence of the Clyde
and Kelvin. The facility will be provided in a new iconic building sitting with water on three sides and
with a strong connection to the river.
As part of the relocation project consideration is being given to access existing public transport hubs
in the immediate area of the museum site and into the ease of walking from these hubs. The transport
hub closest to the museum site is at Govan to the south across the Clyde. This hub offers both bus
and Subway facilities with direct access to the museum only restricted by the river.
At present there are no river crossings for pedestrians between the Millennium Bridge some 1.1km
upstream of Pointhouse and the Clyde Tunnel 1.6km downstream. Neither is directly accessible from
Pointhouse.
The provision of a pedestrian ferry linking Water Row at Govan to Pointhouse would remove these
restrictions and provide an attractive route both in terms of accessibility and visitor experience to the
relocated Transport Museum. It would also provide a unique opportunity to see both the Museum and
the SV Glenlee from the river enhancing the overall visitor experience.
A feasibility study is underway into the provision of a slipway and a pontoon at Pointhouse associated
with the relocation of the Clyde Maritime Trust to the new Transport Museum site and also includes
the provision a pontoon at Govan. Further work is required to ensure that both of these pontoons
could accommodate a pedestrian ferry and associated infrastructure.

POINTHOUSE TO GOVAN FERRY STUDY
To take this work forward, it is proposed to have a multi disciplinary team investigate the various
aspects of the provision of a ferry service to investigate both land based requirements and the type of
ferry vessel to be used.
The team would identify the potential users, frequency of service and facilities provided at the
terminals. Access with appropriate DDA compliance would be a primary requirement of this part of the
work. This information would inform the study already being carried out for the slipway and pontoons.
Vessel designs would be investigated in consultation with naval architects and boat builders with
consideration being given to the on-board facilities for passengers and required capacity. A special
aspect of the study would be to investigate innovative forms of propulsion not reliant on conventional
engines. This would remove the need to store fuel oils close to the river with the associated pollution
dangers.
Early research has identified the potential of using a form of inertial drive using power stored in a
spinning flywheel. The flywheel would be spun up to speed by an electric motor at each terminal from
mains electricity. This form of power pack has not previously been used in the United Kingdom in
waterborne vessels but has been proven in land based vehicles.

It would need to be shown that the
power pack would provide sufficient power to make the crossing at an appropriate speed while coping
with tides, currents and side winds.
All of these technical specifications for the vessel and the power pack would require to satisfy the
requirements of Maritime and Coastguard Agency in terms of safety of operation.
In addition, the study would give recommendations on how the ferry service could be procured and
operated as well as providing estimates of the associated costs.
It has been estimated that the cost of the study would be in the region of £25,000 and could be carried
out and reported during the financial year 2007/08.
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Mori » Tue Mar 11, 2008 12:32 pm

BBC
Hovercraft trials on the River Clyde in Glasgow could see some journeys being cut by up to 20 minutes, operators claim.
A permanent service would involve hovercraft with a capacity of up to 130 passengers, which could travel in the open seas at speeds of up to 40 knots.

The three-day trial, by Clydefast Ltd, will involve a Griffon 2000TD 12-passenger hovercraft.

Hovercraft were last seen in regular use on the Clyde in the late 1960's.

Two trips per day will run between the SECC pontoon in Glasgow, Braehead, East India Harbour in Greenock and Dunoon.

Image
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Sun Nov 09, 2008 11:48 pm

Sitting with a small Martel, a bit pissed off with non-existant imaginary villages, I thought I'd have a look at the ferries waiting for the goods trains coming into General Terminus Quay and West Street Goods Station in the 1850's. (should really get a life !!!)

Image

The Caledonian Railway trains brought in the coal and ironstone from Lanarkshire into General Terminus Quay. Seems to be two ferries either side of Springfield Quay.

Must have been road transport to the river from West Street Goods Station?
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Mori » Mon Nov 24, 2008 2:25 am

ET

Glasgow pushes the boat out

A GLASGOW businessman has taken the first steps towards bringing back river traffic to the Clyde.

Gerry Ferguson has launched a luxury yacht, Helen of Glasgow, and is set to offer private and corporate charters from its city base.

Image
The Helen of Glasgow yacht offers a touch of luxury with its modern living room, bedroom and kitchen facilities

"You can berth at secluded destinations for a leisurely lunch, sample a sip of whisky or perhaps take in a round of golf on some of the best courses in the world."

A day-long charter on the vessel will cost £3000 and a weekly charter £18,000.

Champagne lunch packages at the quayside are available at £89.95.
::):
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Wed Jan 28, 2009 8:46 pm

Stumbled upon the names of the 3 ferry crossings referred to in my previous (drunken) posting while I was researching the site of the new Tradeston Bridge across the Clyde for the River Clyde Regeneration thread.

Image
The ferry from York Street to West Street was the York Street Ferry. The streets are not directly facing each other, hence the current need for a “squiggly” bridge between them?

The ferry from the eastern end of Springfield Quay confused me at first, as it was called the Clyde Street Ferry. The Clyde Street familiar to us nowadays, with the Suspension Bridge and St Andrews Cathedral, was known as “Great Clyde Street” at the time. When its name was changed to plain old Clyde Street, the street in Anderson was re-named “Clyde Ferry Street”. It is now part of the North Street off-ramp from the Kingston Bridge.

The ferry from the western end of Springfield Quay was the Hyde Park Ferry with a landing point close to Hydepark Street, where the Daily Record offices now stand.

Here is a close up view of General Terminus Quay, which was adjacent to Springfield Quay. Freight brought in from the numerous railway lines was moved up and down the two quays by means of travelling cranes along the dockside.
Image


West Street Goods Station was a fair distance away from the river. Any freight seems to have been brought by road and loaded by a single stationary crane onto the York Street Ferry.
Here’s a view of the steps down to the landing point at West Street. At the bottom of the pic you can see that road transport in those days had its own form of filling station…………..
Image
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby tombro » Fri Jan 30, 2009 10:46 am

Anorak,

This is a little off topic but ...

With a granny who lived in Anderston and another who lived over in Govan, travelling across the Clyde on the ferry was a regular occurrence. We used to cross from Clydeferry Street and, this is from fifty years memory, we used to get off and walk up to Govan Cross where we'd catch either a tram or trolley bus towards Craigton Road. Sometimes in summer we would walk.

A question though.

My Anderston Granny lived in a one room on Crimea Street, on the corner of Carrick Street and above the local bookie's shop, and also diagonally opposite a swing park that went from Carrick Street through to McAlpine Street. On your map Crimea Street is referred to as W.College Street, the street running between Brown Street and McAlpine Street. Do you have any information on when, and why, the street name was changed ?

Tombro :?

P.S Is my memory playing tricks or was there another ferry even further to the west that crossed the Clyde somewhere around Partick, but not as far west as Yoker ?

Tombro :?
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Dugald » Fri Jan 30, 2009 11:34 am

P.S Is my memory playing tricks or was there another ferry even further to the west that crossed the Clyde somewhere around Partick, but not as far west as Yoker ?

Yes Tombro, there was another ferry further west than the Govan Cross Ferry. There was the Whiteinch Ferry, just a hop skip and a jump further down the Clyde. I think it was at the foot of Holm St. in Govan, but I'm not certain ( there was a swing park on it);it was just beside the Govan Dock where some steamers once stopped to let passengers off..
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:16 pm

Hi Tombro & Dugald,

The Crimean War took place between 1853 and 1856. Coincidently the above map dates from the same period. My first guess was that the street name was changed to Crimea Street to commemorate the war…………….but……….looking at the map (below) from the mid-1890’s, the street is still called West College Street.
The usual reason for changes was that there were too many streets with similar names after the city boundaries were expanded.

West College Street seems to be surrounded by churches and pubs (marked PH on the map).
Image


Here’s a couple of maps c.1914, showing the ferries in the Govan area.
Image
The Govan Ferry departed at the bottom of Water Row, the Meadowside Ferry at the bottom of Holm Street.

Image
The Whiteinch Ferry left from Holmfauld Road in Linthouse.

Hope this helps solve a few mysteries. I’ll have a wee look for more detailed maps.
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Dugald » Fri Jan 30, 2009 9:09 pm

Anorak, great maps! Your second & third maps, the coloured ones, show the ferry locations exactly as I recall them: the Whiteinch Ferry, right at the foot of Holm St. I have never heard of a ferry at Holmfauld Road in Linthouse ( its location is exactly where I'd say the Whiteinch Ferry was located). In fact, I have never heard of Holmfauld Road in Linthouse. Oh yes, I know of a Holmfaulhead Rd. or Drive, in Linthouse, but Holmfauld Road as shown on your third map must have been before my time. I might mention too, that the the yard shown on your third map as Linthouse Shipbuilding Yard is a completely new name to me . This must have been the yard which eventually became Stephen's Ship Yard... that must have been a long time ago (early post-Crimea War perhaps? ). In Govan the ferry in Linthouse was known as the Whiteinch Ferry; Meadowside Ferry was the Partick name.
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby tombro » Sat Jan 31, 2009 10:24 am

Anorak and Dugald, thanks to both of you for taking the time to reply to my query regarding Crimea Street and the Govan Ferries.

Anorak, your latest map of the junction of Carrick Street and West College Street stirs my memory even more because the fact that it shows a pub on the corner wher my Anderston Granny lived, and that those pub premises could easily have been converted to secrete the illegal bookie shop that I remember, is just amazing. (My Dad was sprung in there a few times, too !) Diagonally opposite was a swing park and, a little further up towards Argyle Street on that side of Carrick Street, was a wee shop.

I seem to remember that Teachers' Whisky had premises in the vicinity, too. It may have been a pub, but might also have been a warehouse, too.

I'm sorry if it sounds like I'm going on with something that might be 'off-topic' but Crimea Street, Anderston and the Govan Ferries did play an important part in my upbringing. My brother and I still have a crayon drawing of a Clyde Ferry, one of those little guys that we crossed the Clyde on many a time, that our late Dad actually won as a prize when he worked for the South Of Scotland Electricity Board during the fifties, before we emigrated to Australia.

If the mods would like to move this correspondence to another area though, then I have no objections !

Tombro :P
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Mori » Sat Jan 31, 2009 5:28 pm

evening times

Image
The Pride O' The Clyde ceased river sailings in October 2007 when she was moved to Loch Katrine



Item 7 ( 5 Pages )

27th January 2009

The River Clyde Waterbus / Ferry Study

Purpose of Report:
To advise Committee of the findings of a study into the use of the River Clyde for Waterbus / Ferry Services

Recommendations:
That Committee notes the recommendations made in the report.

5. STUDY CONCLUSIONS
5.1 The study concluded that the optimum service provision would have the following 4 elements:
Outer area express 1, Dunoon –Gourock – Greenock – Dumbarton – Bowling
Outer area express 2, Helensburgh – Bowling
Inner area express, Bowling – Erskine – Clydebank – Braehead – Central Glasgow
Inner area stopping, Yoker – Braehead – Glasgow Harbour – Govan – SECC – Springfield Quay – Central Glasgow.
These services would require a total of 9 vessels for the express routes and 4 vessels for the stopping service.
5.2 Implementation of the recommended waterbus services would:
• significantly improve accessibility between the north and south banks of the river
• play a key role as part of a world class and integrated public transport network in the Glasgow conurbation
• support ongoing regeneration activities on the waterfront
• encourage modal shift
• support the Commonwealth Games 2014
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Sat Jan 31, 2009 11:35 pm

Came across this 1899 article regarding the Clyde Ferries.

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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Mon Feb 02, 2009 9:13 pm

The Cluthas only lasted another 4 years after the above article was published.
They were withdrawn in 1903 when the electric tramway service along both sides of the Clyde made the little steamers unnecessary.


From the old maps there seems to have been 11 ferry crossings on the river, although not all operated at the same time. The above article refers to 7 crossings in 1899. The Hyde Park Ferry did not seem to be still in operation by the end of the century. Other ferries, further downstream, came later as the riverside was developed.

Going downsteam from east to west the ferries were:
York Street Ferry (York Street to West Street)
Clyde Street Ferry (Clyde Street, Anderston, to Springfield Quay)
Hyde Park Ferry (Hydepark Street to Springfield Quay)
Stobcross Ferry (Finnieston Quay to Mavisbank Quay)
Finnieston Ferry (Finnieston Quay to Mavisbank Quay)
Kelvinhaugh Ferry (Yorkhill Quay to Princes Dock)
Govan Ferry (Ferry Road, Partick, to Water Row, Govan)
Meadowside Ferry (Meadowside Street, Partick to Holm Street, Govan)
Whiteinch Ferry (James Street, Whiteinch to Holmfauld Road, Linthouse)
Renfrew Ferry (Yoker to Renfrew)
Erskine Ferry (Dunbartonshire to Renfrewshire)

The Finnieston vehicular ferry and the Stobcross Ferry appear to have had adjacent landing points at Finnieston Quay beside the north rotunda.
Image

The “Glasgow Story” website has a nice photograph of both ferries and their northern landing points.
http://www.theglasgowstory.com/imageview.php?inum=TGSA02545
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Re: The Clyde ferries

Postby Anorak » Fri Feb 06, 2009 12:35 am

This 1850’s map shows that the Govan Ferry had slipways on either side of the river for vehicular traffic, a long time before the technically superior Finnieston Ferry came into operation in 1890.
Image
Meadowside got its name from a steading on the western side of the Kelvin as the above map shows. This was before the development of the districts and the need for the ferries further downstream from Govan and Partick, shown in this 1914 map (below)
Image


The ferry routes from Govan to Partick and Meadowside were complicated by the fact that they crossed the water at the confluence of the two rivers, the Kelvin and the Clyde.
There are no bridges over either river at this point (and no Clyde Tunnel), so the ferries had to cover transportation over the entire area.
Image
The 1890’s Meadowside Ferry (above) crossed the Kelvin from Meadowside to Partick; the later Meadowside Ferry, which crossed the Clyde, was originally named the Govan West Ferry (below)
Image
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