Hidden Glasgow War Memorials.

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Postby DMcNay » Thu Mar 30, 2006 11:36 pm

And one more just for fun. The memorial for the Union Bank of Scotland. This used to be at their Head Office in Renfield Street. It's either still there, relocated to another bank branch, or it's in a skip....

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Postby Fossil » Fri Mar 31, 2006 7:55 am

Its not been Skipped Doc. The Bank still has it in storage

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Postby viceroy » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:08 am

Doc, I was thinking of the Spanish Civil War memorial just the other day and intended to take a picture next time I was in town but completely forgot about it.

By the way, a while back when I was in Craigton Cemetery I came across the grave of somebody who had lost his life in the Vietnam war. Whether as a combatant or not I don't really know. But it struck me as a pretty unusual grave to find in a Glasgow cemetery. Unfortunately I never took a mental note of its exact location and haven't been able to find it again on subsequent visits, although admittedly I didn't look particularly hard. Will try and make a more thorough search in the near future.
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Postby DMcNay » Fri Mar 31, 2006 12:18 pm

Modern Fossil wrote:Its not been Skipped Doc. The Bank still has it in storage

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Glad to hear it. I reckon they'll display it at Head Office in Edinburgh once the renovations are complete.

How did you hear about it being in storage?
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Postby Fossil » Fri Mar 31, 2006 1:50 pm

Doc Lightning wrote:
Modern Fossil wrote:Its not been Skipped Doc. The Bank still has it in storage

F


Glad to hear it. I reckon they'll display it at Head Office in Edinburgh once the renovations are complete.

How did you hear about it being in storage?


::): remember a while back I was inside -

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Postby crusty_bint » Fri Mar 31, 2006 2:20 pm

I didn't know you'd done time Fossy :wink:
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Postby Fossil » Fri Mar 31, 2006 2:53 pm

crusty_bint wrote:I didn't know you'd done time Fossy :wink:


thank fook for Not Proven ::):

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Postby Alex Glass » Fri Mar 31, 2006 4:45 pm

Well Doc just shows how you can miss whats in front of you. Don't know how I missed that one. I got the two near the gate.

Now that others have mentioned the Battlefield and Spanish memorials here is another one from George Square.

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Nagasaki and Hiroshima 1945.

There are two more war memorials in George Square. Can you name them?
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Soviet War memorial

Postby peter » Fri Mar 31, 2006 9:40 pm

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Soviet War Memorial outside Imperial Wat Museum London.
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Postby HollowHorn » Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:53 pm

Seeing as how we are redefining Glasgow's borders:
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The first enemy aircraft to fall on British soil in the Second World War was a Heinkel He-111, which was shot down at Haddington, East Lothian, on 29 November. The aircraft was originally attacked by Flying Officer Archie McKellar of 602 Squadron, who was then interrupted by the arrival of three Spitfires from 603 Squadron. Although argument rages to this day as to which squadron was the victor, the 'kill' was credited to McKellar.


The Battle of Britain, which took place between July and November of 1940, was the largest air battle in history. The Royal Air Force prevailed through pilots who fought fearlessly to defend their country and people. During this battle, RAF pilots achieved high victory numbers while flying Spitfires and Hurricanes, as they were given the ace status. Among these aces was Squadron Leader Archie Ashmore McKellar, a Scottish native of small stature (5ft. 3” tall) who was a fearless pilot that took the skies during the Battle of Britain.

McKellar was credited with a total 17 victories, 3 shared, 5 probable and another 3 damaged during his career (5 Bf109E’s in a day on October 7th). Most people might remember his famous aircraft numbered UP-A P3308. With that machine Mckellar downed 13.5 airplanes, 4 probable and 1 damaged between August 15th and October 7th. This gave him the highest tally of victories scored by any Hurricane pilot during the Battle of Britain. McKellar passed away when he was shot down near Addisham while flying Hurricane UP-M, V6879.


During his diving attack on the vessels in the Forth, the cockpit canopy of Hauptmann Pohles Ju-88 flew off, leaving the four crewmembers open to the elements. In his embarrassingly exposed position, Pohle climbed away northwards to observe the efforts of his unit. Almost instantly, .303 shells began pounding his aircraft from behind, 602 Squadron had entered the battle. Pohle struggled to shake off his Glaswegian assailants, Flt Lts George Pinkerton and Archie McKellar, who chased the Junkers out to sea. The stricken bomber plunged into the water three miles east of Crail, nearly colliding with a coaster. Pohle was recovered, bleeding from facial wounds suffered in the crash, the other three crewmembers were dead on impact.


Archie McKellar, my leader, decided to attach the big formation, so we turned and climbed into the sun. At that moment I ran out of petrol and by the time I had turned on to my reserve tank Archie was 200 years in front of me. We kept climbing until we were about 4,000 feet above the enemy and directly overhead. Then we turned on our backs and dived to attack....................................................

We had a wizard champagne party in the mess last night. The whole of A Flight was unlucky, they didn't see a thing but our flight sent seven down and damaged six.
R E Jones


I said about not hanging around and McKellar, who eventually became our squadron commander; a chap called Squadron Leader McKellar, who got about twenty plus to his credit during the Battle of Britain. Great character and fiery little Scotsman but a great, great chap… He got three in one day, in fact on this raid that old Churchill lead us into because Archie (Editor's note: Archie McKellar, 21 victories) fired at them and hit the middle one. I forgot to mention this, of these 111s and one hit the other so he got three. He was very lucky, but anyway he got twenty altogether. And one day in November the 109s decided to come over carrying bombs, high level, not escorted and just being nuisance raids to bring us up into the sky. And this was on the 1st November 1940 and we were up and we saw a crowd of these and we were way above them and so Archie said "Come on, here we go down", so we went down but we were much too fast, the dive I know why, we went down like 'that' and the 109s saw us and we overshot them on the way down. A quick burst, they turned and were gone; we overshot. Well, once you do that, I mean, you've had it, you go home, but I did anyway. But Archie being what he was, he thought "No, no, I'm going to chase these so and so's" and that's, unfortunately, was the end of Archie. He went on, on his own, didn't look around, chasing this chap and the last thing was, they saw him going straight into a field in Kent. It's a lesson that I suppose you should've learnt; you just don't take too many chances.


HAWKER HURRICANE Mk IIB
The Hurricane bore the brunt of the fighting during the Battle of Britain &, of the 14,00 built, only three examples remain airworthy. This particular machine is painted to represent the aircraft of the late Squadron Leader Archie McKellar, DSO, DFC.[/b]

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Carmunnock War Memorial

Postby job78989 » Sat Apr 01, 2006 1:29 am

Carmunnock War Memorial just past the garage opposite castlemilk Hall:

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Postby Alex Glass » Sat Apr 01, 2006 8:58 pm

Does any one know how many War Memorials are near Glasgow Cathedral. I think there must be about four. Des any one have any pictures.
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Postby DMcNay » Sat Apr 01, 2006 10:02 pm

Near, or in?
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Postby Alex Glass » Sun Apr 02, 2006 2:04 am

Near Doc
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Postby DMcNay » Sun Apr 02, 2006 9:43 pm

Whereabouts are you thinking?

And what are the ones in George Square you were referring to?
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