BLOCK Architecture 2005 - The HG bit

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Postby JayKay » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:09 pm

personal anecdote?

here's one, although one step removed.

A friend of mine's father was a shipyard worker, and he died about ten years ago. As a result of problems with the undertakers, his ashes were misplaced and the family were not able to receive them. His wish had been for his ashes to be scattered on the Clyde, where he had lived and worked.

As the family did not have ashes to scatter they did the next best thing. They took a trip doon the watter in the Waverly, and at the point roughly where the shipyard he worked at was, the hammer he used thoughout his career at the shipyards was ceremonially lobbed into the Clyde's murky embrace.
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Postby Sharon » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:12 pm

Thats a lovely anecdote... any idea which shipyard he worked at?
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Postby JayKay » Mon Sep 19, 2005 2:53 pm

Not sure I'm afraid. My mate didn't specify. Not seen him in a while.
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Postby AlanM » Tue Sep 20, 2005 8:41 pm

As far as the dark past of the river goes I would suggest contacting George Parsonage at the Glasgow Humane Society. He has rescued and recovered many people from the river and I'm sure he'd have many interesting stories to tell.

HTH

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BLOCK 2005

Postby Socceroo » Wed Sep 21, 2005 8:06 pm

The following is taken from the book “From Glasgow’s Treasure Chest” by James Cowan :

LACING THE RIVER (December 1932)

As might be expected in a native of this “dark sea born city” there are times when I experience an overwhelming desire to find myself afloat, to hear the gurgle of water beneath a boat’s counter, and smell the tang of the sea, or the wershness of the river.

This craving might be satisfied to some extent by sailing on one of the little steamers which ply between Port Dundas and Craigmarloch on the Forth and Clyde Canal; but time on ordinary business days, does not permit of this indulgence.

I am old enough to remember the time when this desire could have been satisfied by a trip down the river on the little “Clutha” steamers which ran from 1884 till 1903. They were discontinued because they could not be run at a profit in competition with the subway and the new electric tramway cars. Some people think that in these days of traffic congestion, when any extra means of transport would be welcome, the “Cluthas” could, with advantage, be restored to the river. Apart from this, however, now that the water is so much purer, it certainly seems a pity that there is not a service of some sort, by means of which our river, with its industrial interests, and the beauties of its lower reaches, could be seen; not only by the citizens themselves, but by the many visitors we have annually.

Even if some enterprising private owner could be permitted to operate a summer service, it would be better than allowing Glasgow’s greatest asset to remain so much neglected.

Until some such dream can be realised, however, I have to content myself with the next best. This I call “lacing the river”, or as much of it as I can manage in the time at my disposal. That is one of the charms of the scheme; it can be lengthened or shortened according to the circumstances of the moment.

I generally make my way first to Clyde Street ferry. If there is not a ferry at once, there is never more than a minute or two to wait for one. I am soon enjoying the sensation of floating, and here let me sing the praises of the much – criticized George V. bridge. If it had done nothing else it would have been welcome for me for its up-river vista from Clyde Street ferry. It is just what was needed to mitigate the ugliness of the railway bridge, and it forms a pleasing picture combined with the dome of the Clyde Trust buildings and the tower of the Sailors’ Home.

Arrived at Springfield Quay on the south – side, I have a choice of what to do. If time is short a walk alongside Kingston Dock will soon take me back to Jamaica Bridge ; but if I turn down the river there is the long stretch of sheds and quays, packed with interest all the way back to Mavisbank. Crossing here, one obtains a splendid view of the largest crane on the Clyde at Stobcross Quay. Then there comes the walk alongside Queen’s Docks, and over the swing bridge to Kelvinhaugh.

Kelvinhaugh is my favourite ferry, for it slants across the river, giving longer on the water than any of the others, and there is usually a fine view of some huge Anchor liner lying at the Quay on the north side.

The next ferry is at Pointhouse. It is exceptionally interesting on account of the view of the stocks in Meadowside shipyard, and the accumulation of shipping of many types generally to be seen in the mouth of the Kelvin, which there joins the Clyde. If I land at Pointhouse , however, I generally just wait for the next ferry back to the south side, because I thus avoid the detour necessary to cross the Kelvin by the iron passage from Ferry Road to Meadowside Street and the ferry there.

Whereas, on the south side it is only a short distance along in front of Harland and Wolff’s to Govan Ferry, and there is an interesting view to Meadowside shipyard on the other side all the way.

The next stage, from Govan to Whiteinch ferry on the south side, or from Meadowside to Whiteinch on the north side, is now a rather long walk either way. As a rule, I prefer the south side along Govan Road as it can be pleasantly varied – although not shortened – by entering Elder Park, so that its beauty can be enjoyed for a part of the way, and there is no such pleasant variation on the north side.

Whiteinch is the farthest down of the free city ferries, and time never permits me to go beyond it.

In this way I “lace the river” crossing and re-crossing as I find it most convenient at the moment. It must not be imagined that I complete the whole “lacing” in one expedition. To do so would involve walking probably as much as seven miles, in addition to the ferry crossings. It is one of my ambitions to do this when time permits ; but I have done it many times in sections, and for general interest and as a palliative for the cooped – up sea – lover’s craving for the water, I know nothing better than “lacing the river” – and it can all be done for nothing.

There is also a pedestrian version of “lacing the river” which I have frequently indulged in; but, as with ferries, never all at one time, as that would involve too long a walk.

Anyone wanting to obtain a good idea of the city’s relationship with the river along which it has grown could hardly do better than “lace the river” by the ten bridges from Dalmarnock Bridge to George V Bridge, in course of which expedition many of the most interesting of the city’s historical points could be observed.

The aerial photograph on p. 43 gives an excellent idea of the main city river crossings from the tidal weir to George V Bridge, which will no doubt be the last to span the Clyde, until the much-talked-of Finnieston Bridge comes into being – if it ever does. The George V Bridge has been much criticized ; but it has undoubtedly improved the vista from down river, and its extreme usefulness cannot be denied. It has three spans – a middle one of 146ft. with side spans each 110ft. It is 80ft wide. The memorial stone was laid by His Majesty King George V on July 12, 1927.
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Postby Dexter St. Clair » Thu Sep 22, 2005 7:27 am

because I thus avoid the detour necessary to cross the Kelvin by the iron passage from Ferry Road to Meadowside Street and the ferry there.


Thanks for that. It is the first reference I have seen to a covered walkway that I can just recall on trips from Govan to the Kelvin Hall. I've never seen anything about it before and I thought I had dreamt it.

Where's that Govan Reminiscence Group? My time is due.
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Postby Sharon » Thu Sep 22, 2005 10:09 am

Great info Soccerroooo , I must get a hold of that book!!

Its likely that we will draw attention to the old crossing points on the Clyde be it Fords, ferry or tunnel... crossing points have always connectred people to the river.

Great stuff...

We are still looking for some personal memories and anedotes, or events that happened on this stretch of the Clyde.

Cheers
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More Ideas

Postby job78989 » Thu Sep 22, 2005 2:05 pm

Hi Sharon,

The Glasgow Garden Festival, took place on this part of the river, in was it 1988? There must be thousands who visited that site and took pics, this must be of note me thinks, the building of Bells Bridge, trams. The use of the rotundas at this time informed many Glaswegians, that there was aslo a transport tunnel associated with these sites. The sites of the old Docks and Shipping Quays both passenger and goods, the puffers that used to go slightly further up river, some of them were able to lower their funnels to get under the bridges and dock at custom house quay. Have we asked the question, What misty remants of that event still exist 17 years later? Perhaps not of great interest to us at the moment, but are we sitting back and ignoring the Hidden Glasgow of future generations. How do we today, value the Great exhibitions in Kelvingrove, Empire Exhibitin at Belahouston and yes even Crystal Palace in 1851. The limited information on these events provides us with a massive database of the social history of the time. We should remember that the current twentysomethings may not even know that the Garden Festival ever took place. You never know there may actually still be some evidence of the festival left! i.e. New buildings, tarted up buildings, remains of temprary structures, etc, etc.
Last edited by job78989 on Fri Oct 07, 2005 10:39 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby thecatsmother » Fri Sep 23, 2005 1:15 pm

The Garden Festival Logo is on the gable of one of the buildings, which can be seen from the Clyde. I think they were the show houses that were built for the festival. And then there's Festival Park.
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Postby My Kitten » Sun Sep 25, 2005 7:30 pm

I still have my garden festival book, what about stuff on the festival and on what was there before it too? Tie it in with graving docks?
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Postby McShad » Sun Sep 25, 2005 8:07 pm

I'm sure if I dig real deep in the mothers archive of photographs, I'll find the pictures from the garden festival..

I've already found a picture of the finnieston crane from after the festival with the paper boat hanging from it
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Postby Sharon » Sun Sep 25, 2005 8:54 pm

At most we will use a single image of the festival site... also what pre-dated the festival. Just a case of selecting a key image for it. However some nice potted history of the site (and others).

Bear in mind we aren't writing a book... just a wee leaflet... though the accompanying "tour" will use the info!! YET!! :)

Again, wee snippets of stories would be good.

But dig out stuff anyway, theres a garden festival thread on here somewhere that would appreciate new stuff added to it!!!
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Postby volantra » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:33 am

im going on the boat trip with hg :D and i was wondering if anyone could shed light on what the small building siting in the wasteland derelict across from the tall ship and to the side of the science centre tower is?
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Postby Sharon » Thu Sep 29, 2005 10:41 am

Cool be sure to introduce yourself, and save that question for the day!!!

Or look here http://www.hiddenglasgow.com/govangravi ... /index.htm ;)
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BLOCK 2005

Postby Socceroo » Tue Oct 04, 2005 12:44 pm

From the People's History of Glasgow by J K M'Dowall (1899)

FLOOD IN 1712

The Bridgegate and Saltmarket and the lower parts of the City were submerged - by the Clyde overflowing its banks to eighteen and a half feet above the high water mark - in 1712

FLOOD IN 1795

A great flood occurred in November 1795. The Clyde overflowed its banks, and for five days the Bridgegate, Saltmarket, Gorbals, Stockwell and Jamaica Street were inundated, and Hutchesontown Bridge, in course of erection was swept away, and one little boy was drowned.

FLOOD IN 1815

The Clyde rose seventeen feet above high-water on 30th December of this year, in consequence of which the low-lying parts of the City were under water, but fortunately the duration was short.

FATAL FERRY ACCIDENTS

The Govan ferryboat was overturned at Partick on 06th April 1861, and seven lives lost. The accident was caused by overcrowding.

This accident caused the Pier at Partick to be shortly afterwards erected.

About three and a half years after this sad affair another similar accident occurred at Clyde Street. About 6p.m. on the 30th November 1864, no fewer than twenty-seven men, mostly workmen, packed themselves into the Clyde Street boat.

The water was rough and the "Inverary Castle" passing at the time, bad steering caused the swell to come over the broadside of the rowing boat. The occupants crushed to the lee side, with the result that the boat upset. All were thrown into the water, and only eight were saved, nineteen being drowned. This calamity was responsible for the introduction of steam ferries.

"DAPHNE" DISASTER

On 3rd July 1883, while the steamer "Daphne" was being launched from Linthouse Shipbuiding Yard, the Vessel capsized and over 200 workmen who were on board were immersed in the Clyde.

The sight was one of the most appalling ever seen in the city, and despite every effort 146 lives were lost.

Three weeks elapsed before the vessel was raised and the bodies recovered. A relief fund amounting to over thirty thousand pounds was raised to assit the widows and orphans.
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