BLOCK Architecture Festival - The HG submission

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Postby gap74 » Mon Aug 16, 2004 7:57 am

I think highlighting some of the recent losses through neglect would be good, although it may end up sounding like an anti-council rant if we expressed exactly how we felt about it!

So Virginia Galleries, Greek Thomson's offices in West Regent Street and his warehouses near Glasgow Cross, all currently ugly gap sites which help accentuate the sense of loss.

Could also suggest Glasgow Green Station, since there's still something of the street level building there to hint it what it once was.

Not quite cinemas, but there are plenty of theatres that I could waffle about for a paragraph or two - the legendary Empire (now a hideously small low rise concrete block, whose only saving grace is an Ann Summers shop!) , the gargantuan Alhambra (now anonymous offices) and the two Theatre Royals other than the one I'm sitting in just now - the Dunlop Street one being replaced by a railway station followed by the St Enoch Centre, and the Queen St one, near what is now GoMA.

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Postby nodrog » Mon Aug 16, 2004 8:16 am

gap74 wrote:I could waffle about for a paragraph or two - the legendary Empire (now a hideously small low rise concrete block, whose only saving grace is an Ann Summers shop!)


Have a read at my third paragraph on the previous page!

But I agree about the Greek Thomson stuff. We have lots of pics of it in various stages of demolition as well...
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Postby gap74 » Mon Aug 16, 2004 8:40 am

Oops! Still way before my natural awake time, had forgotten you put that in!

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Postby jim » Mon Aug 16, 2004 9:13 am

Here are some:

Heron House

Botanic Station

DeQuincey House

Rottenrow

I'll probably write up Heron House and maybe Rottenrow.
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Postby Ronnie » Mon Aug 16, 2004 11:28 am

Here's a stab at an introduction and some lost buildings.

==

A tourist, looking around the scaffolding, overflowing skips and estate agents’ boards of the Merchant City, once observed: “Interesting place, Glasgow. It’ll be nice when it’s finished.” The point about cities, though, is that they are always works in progress, and those who live in them, or even visit them, inhabit a curious world of the built, the demolished and the not yet built.
We walk down High Street, passing the empty space opposite College Street. All at once, we see it as the former site of Glasgow University, a vast and untended car park, and a forthcoming science business park. We are able to hold in our head the past, present and future of this slice of earth.
While the future is seen in terms of an artist’s impression – sleek lines, utopian transport schemes, cloudless skies and shiny people – the past is altogether darker. We like to remember the prisons, asylums, poor houses, slum tenements, the sites of public hangings, the Magdalen and the Lock Hospital. These memories cloud our vision of present realities.
The past has a power over us, not just as a layer beneath the present, to be scratched and sniffed, dug up and mummified in museums, recycled as fiction, retold as fanciful stories for the tourists, made safe and sanitary, contained in myth.
What is gone still has the elemental power to remind us of ourselves in earlier incarnations, as the victim of plague or pox, the condemned prisoner, the scholar subsisting for a term on a poke of meal, the gravedigger in an overcrowded and charnel-ridden churchyard, or even an archbishop, lording it over the masses in our own castle.
All of these tales are grounded in an address, a lost building that is now a weed-strewn plot, a car park or a new structure. Buildings, past or present, are the guardians of memory and the ghosts of the past that will forever haunt us. Buildings are the key to the puzzle, the treasure map, the faded painted sign pointing to the past.
This booklet, therefore, is a guide to the vanished city, the structures that still exert a power from beyond the grave, the ghostly past that still radiates from the earth, the memories of an earlier civilisation. As you take our tour, these lost buildings will appear in the corner of your eye, flashing in an out of view in front of their replacements. And for just a moment, the fabric of time is ripped and the past becomes more real than the present.


The Bishops’ Palace, which stood where the St Mungo Museum now stands, was built between 1438 and 1530 by the archbishops of Glasgow. It was surrounded by a 15 foot high wall, which provided security and privacy to the Roman Catholic leaders of the city. It was demolished gradually, as people took the building stones to re-use in other projects, between the Reformation in 1560 and around 1790. The building is remembered in the name of Castle Street. The bishops also had a summer castle, or palace, on the banks of the Clyde in Partick. This is recalled in Castlebank Street. Nearby were the original Royal Infirmary - built by Robert Adam and replaced in 1907 by James Miller – and the two western towers of Glasgow Cathedral, pulled down in 1849.

The Lunatic Asylum, on the north side of Parliamentary Road, was built in 1814 by William Stark. From above, it was shaped like a St Andrew’s cross, with a tower at the centre. Patients – who paid for their bed and board – were segregated by position in society, gender and degree of insanity. Around 1840, the business of the asylum moved to Gartnavel Hospital in the west, and the building was converted for use as a poorhouse, which was demolished in 1908. The site is now on the campus of Glasgow Caledonian University.

Glasgow University stood on the west side of High Street. The university was founded in 1451, in the under-church of the cathedral, and the High Street buildings dated from 1630. After a railway company bought the site, the university moved to Gilmorehill in 1870, and the buildings were flattened. Some parts of the frontage were incorporated in the Pearce Lodge, which still stands at the east end of University Avenue. Behind the university were extensive gardens, the original Hunterian Museum, built by William Stark in 1805, and an observatory. College Street, named after the university, was flanked by two grand James Adam tenement buildings, built in 1793 as the first part of an expanded campus. They were demolished as recently as 1973.

Duke Street Prison, of which only the cut-down outer walls remain, was built in 1825 in the grounds of the House of Correction in Duke Street, as the City and County Bridewell. When Barlinnie Prison was opened in 1882, Duke Street became largely a women’s prison until it was closed in 1955. It was demolished in 1958, and later became the site of the Drygate housing estate. Public executions took place inside the prison from 1865 to 1928.

The Glasgow Maternity Hospital, Rottenrow, was established in a large domestic house and grounds in 1858. That was demolished in 1879 and a new Gothic structure was built to the designs of Robert Baldie, and in 1908 a new structure was added to accommodate the rising population. What was once the biggest and busiest maternity hospital in Scotland – where millions of Glaswegians first saw the light of day – was demolished in 2003 and is now a pleasure garden.

The Magdalen Asylum, a charitable body that was established in 1812, locked up women who behaved “immorally”. Those who qualified for the description included prostitutes, unmarried mothers, socialists, mill girls and women who dressed provocatively. Women were admitted to the institution, on the north side of Parliamentary Road, only if they were willing to submit to discipline and be “reformed”, and were taught how to support themselves honestly through training for work, mostly as laundry-women. They were also encouraged to embrace Christianity. A related institution, the Lock Hospital for the treatment of women with venereal diseases, was opened in 1805 at 39 Rottenrow.

[ends]
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Postby james73 » Mon Aug 16, 2004 12:37 pm

St Enoch Station & Hotel.










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Postby nodrog » Mon Aug 16, 2004 12:44 pm

james73 wrote:St Enoch Station & Hotel.


Absolutely!

Now any chance of a paragraph or so about it? ;)
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Postby james73 » Mon Aug 16, 2004 12:56 pm

nodrog wrote:
james73 wrote:St Enoch Station & Hotel.


Absolutely!

Now any chance of a paragraph or so about it? ;)



Maybe later....



:wink:




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Postby Ronnie » Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:30 pm

I will post illustrations (from 1893, so out of copyright) of the Bishops' Palace and the Old College later, once I have scanned them. They are from Sketches from Glasgow, by J A Hammerton.
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Postby crusty_bint » Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:40 pm

Great work Ronnie! You too Gap!

What are we doing about copyrights on pics by the way?

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Postby crusty_bint » Mon Aug 16, 2004 3:55 pm

Also, does anyone have (or know where to get) a nice map of central glasgow?
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Postby jim » Mon Aug 16, 2004 5:41 pm

Great intro Ronnie. Your not just a pretty face...
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Postby Ronnie » Tue Aug 17, 2004 11:50 am

Thanks, Jim. I'm glad you like me for my mind and not just my, eh, "pretty face" ... ::):
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Postby Sharon » Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:18 pm

Guys...and I mean other than Ronnie and nodrog and crusty.... we could use a few more suggestions here!!
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Postby Fossil » Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:26 pm

The George Hotel
GPO Building on George Square
Boots Corner

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