Tunnels & Stations

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Tunnels & Stations

Postby Joel » Mon Mar 25, 2002 10:57 pm

Now that is interesting to hear, I knew of some of the tunnels and
stations, but i didnt know about that one! There does appear to be
alot of this kind of stuff in Glasgow...the city appeared keen on
tunnels.


I know there were certainly a few more low-level/underground stations around than there are now:- check out the remains of the old "Glasgow Green" Station near the Templeton Business Centre ( aka the Carpet Factory) just off London Road - the entrance is quite clear, however if you go round the corner and look over the fence, you can see where the stairs originally went down to meet the track, denoted by all the tiles on the walls ( sadly the stairs are long gone).

There are still train tracks in use on the site ( the eastern end of the low level trains); one thing I haven't seen though is whether or not there are the remains of the old platforms by the line...
Joel
 

Under London Road!

Postby Sharon » Tue Mar 26, 2002 12:36 pm

Following is an extract from a now expired website that i visited (The Milk Crate Gang i think)- sadly none of the photographs were online ;o(

Bridgeton - Parkhead
The Glasgow Central Railway


Eastbound from Central Station, the low level route reached a junction at Bridgeton, the still used Argyle Line running southeast to Dalmarnock, while another branch followed London Road out to Parkhead, and then on to Carmyle and the Clyde Viaduct. How many people walking along London Road today realise that they are being supported by this long abandoned island platform below?

This is the western end of Bridgeton station, with the re-built "Argyle Line" on the left and the abandoned Parkhead route on the right.

The next few views give a feel for the atmosphere of this long abandoned structure, shot in the evening light of a warm August day in the dying years of the 20th century.

This view shows one of the columns supporting London Road above. Note how the top flanges of the horizontal primary beams taper down towards the column, an unusual arrangement. The line of columns appears to run roughly down the centre of the abandoned platform (the brickwork at the bottom of the picture indicates the outer platform edge), we assume there used to be an iron and glass canopy projecting over the open side of the platform, however all trace of such a structure has vanished. Does anyone know if we are correct? All information welcome!

The inner retaining wall, beyond the Parkhead-bound trackbed, gives the appearance of utter dereliction, with huge areas of fallen tiles and broken brickwork. On the left is one of the workmen's refuges, while on the right is an area of original tiling.

At the eastern end of the platform, the support columns had to make way for the westbound track, which emerged from London Road Tunnel in line with the platform and then swung out round it. The engineers solution was to use a modified version of the flange carried brick arch, with larger than usual arches, and the outer end of each beam mounted on its own column.

The two pictures below show this construction. The upper image, looking East towards the London Road Tunnel mouth, shows the massive plate girder beams spanning the westbound trackbed, while in the lower view the brick arches, sprung from the lower flanges of the beams, can be clearly seen.

Beyond the beams the tunnel proper begins, this view was taken from the the remains of the end of the platform ramp, looking East towards "Paradise", although the tunnel itself looks more like the gates of Hell...

The flooring in this tunnel is very uneven, work on the drainage system is clearly on-going, judging by the tyre marks from contractor's vehicles on the ground. There are two ventilation shafts in the tunnel, both on the south side (the sharp eyed can spot the brick and stone upperworks from London Road itself), and both having a double row of supporting columns, dating from the London Road widening in the 1930's.

At the far end, the tunnel swings left, out from under the road, and emerges into a deep cutting a stone's throw from Celtic's Parkhead Stadium. It is somewhat bizarre that both of Glasgow's big football grounds had stations, and that both were closed in the 60's!

This is the Parkhead Portal, a victim of the Mad Bricklayer from Hell. The wooden beam fixed to the left hand wall appears to have been a mount for a signal.

The cutting has been filled in with a tarmac ramp, which leads up to a side street going directly to the football ground. There are an incredible number of abandoned shoes at this end of the tunnel.
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Postby Sharon » Tue Mar 26, 2002 2:24 pm

I think this stuff is worth a project forum of its own!

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Postby Anne » Wed May 01, 2002 5:08 pm

::):
Hi there
This stuff reminds me of an article that i read in the hearld once...What I suggest is that if you guys want more info on this stuff then contact the paper, they are usually more than willing to help and may even be able to provide pictures...I seem to recall that some accompanied the article.!! Worth a try anyway, they may even have other info on Glasgow stuff!!
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